SHOX Gene Is Expressed in Vertebral Body Growth Plates in Idiopathic and Congenital Scoliosis: Implications for the Etiology of Scoliosis in Turner Syndrome

Day, Gregory, Szvetko, Attila, Griffiths, Lyn, McPhee, I. Bruce, Tuffley, John, LaBrom, Robert, Askin, Geoffrey, Woodland, Peter, McClosky, Eamonn, Torode, Ian and Tomlinson, Francis (2009) SHOX Gene Is Expressed in Vertebral Body Growth Plates in Idiopathic and Congenital Scoliosis: Implications for the Etiology of Scoliosis in Turner Syndrome. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 27 6: 807-813. doi:10.1002/jor.20801


Author Day, Gregory
Szvetko, Attila
Griffiths, Lyn
McPhee, I. Bruce
Tuffley, John
LaBrom, Robert
Askin, Geoffrey
Woodland, Peter
McClosky, Eamonn
Torode, Ian
Tomlinson, Francis
Title SHOX Gene Is Expressed in Vertebral Body Growth Plates in Idiopathic and Congenital Scoliosis: Implications for the Etiology of Scoliosis in Turner Syndrome
Journal name Journal of Orthopaedic Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0736-0266
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jor.20801
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 27
Issue 6
Start page 807
End page 813
Total pages 7
Place of publication United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc.
Language eng
Subject C1
970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
110105 Medical Biochemistry: Nucleic Acids
Abstract Reduced SHOX gene expression has been demonstrated to be associated with all skeletal abnormalities in Turner syndrome, other than scoliosis (and kyphosis). There is evidence to suggest that Turner syndrome scoliosis is clinically and radiologically similar to idiopathic scoliosis, although the phenotypes are dissimilar. This pilot gene expression study used relative quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of the SHOX (short stature on X) gene to determine whether it is expressed in vertebral body growth plates in idiopathic and congenital scoliosis. After vertebral growth plate dissection, tissue was examined histologically and RNA was extracted and its integrity was assessed using a Bio-Spec Mini, NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and standard denaturing gel electrophoresis. Following cDNA synthesis, gene-specific optimization in a Corbett RotorGene 6000 real-time cycler was followed by qRT-PCR of vertebral tissue. Histological examination of vertebral samples confirmed that only growth plate was analyzed for gene expression. Cycling and melt curves were resolved in triplicate for all samples. SHOX abundance was demonstrated in congenital and idiopathic scoliosis vertebral body growth plates. SHOX expression was 11-fold greater in idiopathic compared to congenital (n = 3) scoliosis (p = 0.027). This study confirmed that SHOX was expressed in vertebral body growth plates, which implies that its expression may also be associated with the scoliosis (and kyphosis) of Turner syndrome. SHOX expression is reduced in Turner syndrome (short stature). In this study, increased SHOX expression was demonstrated in idiopathic scoliosis (tall stature) and congenital scoliosis. © 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 27: 807-813, 2009
Keyword Orthopedics
Orthopedics
ORTHOPEDICS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 008RF
LP0455069
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:09:23 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Medicine - Princess Alexandra Hospital