Upstairs and Downstairs Socio-Economic and Gender Interactions in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Seroprevalence in Australia

Page, Andrew, Taylor, Richard, Richters, Juliet, Shaw, Jonathan, Taylor, Janette, Cunningham, Anthony and Mindel, Adrian (2009) Upstairs and Downstairs Socio-Economic and Gender Interactions in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Seroprevalence in Australia. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 36 6: 344-349. doi:10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181990c9a


Author Page, Andrew
Taylor, Richard
Richters, Juliet
Shaw, Jonathan
Taylor, Janette
Cunningham, Anthony
Mindel, Adrian
Title Upstairs and Downstairs Socio-Economic and Gender Interactions in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Seroprevalence in Australia
Journal name Sexually Transmitted Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0148-5717
1537-4521
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181990c9a
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 36
Issue 6
Start page 344
End page 349
Total pages 6
Editor Schchter, Julius.
Place of publication PA, USA
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
C1
Abstract Background: This study investigates socio-economic differentials in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) seroprevalence in Australian men and women using individual and geographic measures of socio-economic status. Methods: HSV-2 seropositivity among men and women aged over 25 years was investigated by levels of individual and area-based measures of socio-economic status (SES) in a series of Poisson regression models, variously adjusting for age, country of birth, marital status, indigenous status, and urban/rural residence as potential con-founders. Serum and socio-demographics were collected during 1999 and 2000 in a population-based Australia-wide prevalence survey. Results: HSV-2 seroprevalence was significantly lower in areas of low SES than in high SES areas among both men (P for trend < 0.001) and women (P for trend = 0.004) for all ages. A similar pattern was evident for individual education level for men with lower rates of HSV-2 in respondents with lower educational achievement (relative risk = 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.97, P = 0.024). In contrast, HSV-2 prevalence was higher for women with lower individual levels of education for all ages (relative risk = 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44, P = 0.017). Analyses stratifying HSV-2 prevalence for individual education level by area-based SES showed the highest prevalence of HSV-2 in women with the lowest education level residing in the highest SES areas. This pattern was not evident in men, with a greater concordance between individual and area-based SES. Conclusion: HSV-2 seroprevalence is not consistently distributed across individual and area measures of SES, suggesting that upward and downward mixing between social strata in men and women is an important mode of HSV-2 transmission.
Keyword Sexually-transmitted Infections
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:03:56 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Public Health