Silver deposits in cutaneous burn scar tissue is a common phenomenon following application of a silver dressing

Xue-Qing, Wang, Hong-En, Chang, Rod, Francis, Henry, Olszowy, Pei-Yun, Liu, Margit, Kempf, Leila, Cuttle, Olena, Kravchuk,, Gael E., Phillips and Roy M., Kimble (2009) Silver deposits in cutaneous burn scar tissue is a common phenomenon following application of a silver dressing. Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, 36 7: 788-792. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0560.2008.01141.x


Author Xue-Qing, Wang
Hong-En, Chang
Rod, Francis
Henry, Olszowy
Pei-Yun, Liu
Margit, Kempf
Leila, Cuttle
Olena, Kravchuk,
Gael E., Phillips
Roy M., Kimble
Title Silver deposits in cutaneous burn scar tissue is a common phenomenon following application of a silver dressing
Journal name Journal of Cutaneous Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0303-6987
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1600-0560.2008.01141.x
Open Access Status
Volume 36
Issue 7
Start page 788
End page 792
Total pages 5
Editor J. W. Patterson
Place of publication Denmark
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard
Language eng
Subject C1
920117 Skin and Related Disorders
110304 Dermatology
110305 Emergency Medicine
Abstract Silver dressings have been widely and successfully used to prevent cutaneous wounds, including burns, chronic ulcers, dermatitis and other cutaneous conditions, from infection. However, in a few cases, skin discolouration or argyria-like appearances have been reported. This study investigated the level of silver in scar tissue post-burn injury following application of Acticoat (TM), a silver dressing.
Formatted abstract
Background: Silver dressings have been widely and successfully used to prevent cutaneous wounds, including burns, chronic ulcers, dermatitis and other cutaneous conditions, from infection. However, in a few cases, skin discolouration or argyria-like appearances have been reported. This study investigated the level of silver in scar tissue post-burn injury following application of Acticoat™, a silver dressing.

Methods:
A porcine deep dermal partial thickness burn model was used. Burn wounds were treated with this silver dressing until completion of re-epithelialization, and silver levels were measured in a total of 160 scars and normal tissues.

Results:
The mean level of silver in scar tissue covered with silver dressings was 136 μg/g, while the silver level in normal skin was less than 0.747 μg/g. A number of wounds had a slate-grey appearance, and dissection of the scars revealed brown-black pigment mostly in the middle and deep dermis within the scar. The level of silver and the severity of the slate-grey discolouration were correlated with the length of time of the silver dressing application.

Conclusions:
These results show that silver deposition in cutaneous scar tissue is a common phenomenon, and higher levels of silver deposits and severe skin discolouration are correlated with an increase in the duration of this silver dressing application.
Keyword cutaneous
Burn
Scar
sulfadiazine cream
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:02:07 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Paediatrics & Child Health - RBWH