Prevalence of health behaviours in pregnancy at service entry in a Queensland health service district

Wilkinson, Shelley A., Miller, Yvette D. and Watson, Bernadette (2009) Prevalence of health behaviours in pregnancy at service entry in a Queensland health service district. Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 33 3: 228-233. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00380.x


Author Wilkinson, Shelley A.
Miller, Yvette D.
Watson, Bernadette
Title Prevalence of health behaviours in pregnancy at service entry in a Queensland health service district
Journal name Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00380.x
Open Access Status
Volume 33
Issue 3
Start page 228
End page 233
Total pages 6
Editor Jeanne Daly
Judith Lumley
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
920205 Health Education and Promotion
Abstract Objective: Limited prevalence data for unhealthy pregnancy health behaviours make it difficult to prioritise primary prevention efforts for maternal and infant health. This study's objective was to establish the prevalence of cigarette smoking, sufficient fruit and vegetable intake and sufficient physical activity among women accessing antenatal clinics in a Queensland (Australia) health service district. Method: Cross-sectional self-reported smoking status, daily fruit and vegetable intake, weekly physical activity and a range of socio-demographic variables were obtained from women recruited at their initial antenatal clinic visit, over a three-month recruitment phase during 2007. Results: Analyses were based on 262 pregnant women. The study sample was broadly representative of women giving birth in the district and state, with higher representation of women with low levels of education and high income. More than one quarter of women were smoking. Few women met the guidelines for sufficient fruit (9.2%), vegetables (2.7%) or physical activity (32.8%) during pregnancy. Conclusions: There were low levels of adherence to health behaviour recommendations for pregnancy in this sample. Implications: There is a clear need to develop and evaluate effective pregnancy behaviour interventions to improve primary prevention in maternal and infant health. Brief minimal contact interventions that can be delivered through primary care to create a greater primary prevention focus for maternal and infant health would be worth exploring.
Formatted abstract
Objective: Limited prevalence data for unhealthy pregnancy health behaviours make it difficult to prioritise primary prevention efforts for maternal and infant health. This study's objective was to establish the prevalence of cigarette smoking, sufficient fruit and vegetable intake and sufficient physical activity among women accessing antenatal clinics in a Queensland (Australia) health service district.
Method: Cross-sectional self-reported smoking status, daily fruit and vegetable intake, weekly physical activity and a range of socio-demographic variables were obtained from women recruited at their initial antenatal clinic visit, over a three-month recruitment phase during 2007.
Results: Analyses were based on 262 pregnant women. The study sample was broadly representative of women giving birth in the district and state, with higher representation of women with low levels of education and high income. More than one quarter of women were smoking. Few women met the guidelines for sufficient fruit (9.2%), vegetables (2.7%) or physical activity (32.8%) during pregnancy.
Conclusions: There were low levels of adherence to health behaviour recommendations for pregnancy in this sample.
Implications: There is a clear need to develop and evaluate effective pregnancy behaviour interventions to improve primary prevention in maternal and infant health. Brief minimal contact interventions that can be delivered through primary care to create a greater primary prevention focus for maternal and infant health would be worth exploring.
Keyword antenatal
health behaviours
maternal health
nutrition
physical activity
pregnancy
preventive
primary prevention
smoking
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:00:55 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology