Stop Task After-Effects The Extent of Slowing During the Preparation and Execution of Movement

Enticott, Peter G., Bradshaw, John L., Bellgrove, Mark A., Upton, Daniel J. and Ogloff, James R.P. (2009) Stop Task After-Effects The Extent of Slowing During the Preparation and Execution of Movement. Experimental Psychology, 56 4: 247-251. doi:10.1027/1618-3169.56.4.247


Author Enticott, Peter G.
Bradshaw, John L.
Bellgrove, Mark A.
Upton, Daniel J.
Ogloff, James R.P.
Title Stop Task After-Effects The Extent of Slowing During the Preparation and Execution of Movement
Formatted title
Stop Task After-Effects
The Extent of Slowing During the Preparation and Execution of Movement
Journal name Experimental Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1618-3169
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1027/1618-3169.56.4.247
Open Access Status
Volume 56
Issue 4
Start page 247
End page 251
Total pages 5
Editor Edgar Erdfelder
Place of publication United States
Publisher Hogrefe Publishing Corp.
Language eng
Subject 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
C1
Abstract In the stop task, response time to the go signal is increased when the immediately preceding trial involves the presentation of a stop signal. A recent explanation suggests that these ‘‘after-effects’’ are due to mechanisms that occur prior to the completion of response selection processes, but it is possible that they instead may reflect a slowed motor response (i.e., deliberate slowing after response selection). The participants completed a novel stop task that allows a differentiation between the time taken to prepare a movement (which incorporates response selection processes) and the time taken to execute a movement (i.e., speed of motor response). If mechanisms underlying stop task after-effects occur prior to the completion of response selection processes, then slowing should only occur during movement preparation. Movement preparation and execution time during go trials were analysed according to the characteristics of the preceding trial. Slowing after a stop trial was found during movement preparation time (regardless of inhibition success on that stop trial), and it further increased during this period when the primary task stimulus was repeated. There was also evidence for general after-effects during movement execution time, but no effect of repetition. These findings support the current theoretical accounts that suggest that repetition-based stop task after-effects are attributable to a mechanism that occurs prior to the completion of response selection processes, and also indicate a possible switch to a more conservative response set (as in signal detection theory terms) that results in deliberate slowing of movement.
Keyword stop task
after-effects
motor preparation
repetition priming
control adjustments
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:00:24 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology