Relationship between the physicochemical properties of nonchitinolytic Listeria and Salmonella and their attachment to shrimp carapace

Wan Norhana, M. N., Goulter, Rebecca M., Poole, Susan E., Deeth, Hilton C. and Dykes, Gary A. (2009) Relationship between the physicochemical properties of nonchitinolytic Listeria and Salmonella and their attachment to shrimp carapace. Journal of Food Protection, 72 6: 1181-1189. doi:10.4315/0362-028X-72.6.1181


Author Wan Norhana, M. N.
Goulter, Rebecca M.
Poole, Susan E.
Deeth, Hilton C.
Dykes, Gary A.
Title Relationship between the physicochemical properties of nonchitinolytic Listeria and Salmonella and their attachment to shrimp carapace
Formatted title
Relationship between the physicochemical properties of nonchitinolytic Listeria and Salmonella and their attachment to shrimp carapace
Journal name Journal of Food Protection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0362-028X
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.4315/0362-028X-72.6.1181
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 72
Issue 6
Start page 1181
End page 1189
Total pages 9
Editor Lisa K. Hovey
Place of publication Ames, IA, U.S.A.
Publisher International Association for Food Protection
Language eng
Subject C1
860103 Carcass Meat (incl. Fish and Seafood)
090899 Food Sciences not elsewhere classified
Abstract Listeria and Salmonella are important foodborne pathogens normally associated with the shrimp production chain. This study investigated the potential of Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Senftenberg, and Listeria monocytogenes (Scott A and V7) to attach to and colonize shrimp carapace. Attachment and colonization of Listeria and Salmonella were demonstrated. Shrimp abdominal carapaces showed higher levels of bacterial attachment (P<0.05) than did head carapaces. Listeria consistently exhibited greater attachment (P<0.05) than did Salmonella on all surfaces. Chitinase activity of all strains was tested and found not to occur at the three temperatures (10, 25, and 37°C) tested. The surface physicochemical properties of bacterial cells and shrimp carapace were studied to determine their role in attachment and colonization. Salmonella had significantly (P<0.05) more positive (-3.9 and -6.0 mV) cell surface charge than Listeria (-18 and -22.8 mV) had. Both bacterial species were found to be hydrophilicn (<35%) when measured by the bacterial adherence to hydrocarbon method and by contact angle (θ) measurements (Listeria, 21.3 and 24.8°, and Salmonella, 14.5 and 18.9°). The percentage of cells retained by Phenyl-Sepharose was lower for Salmonella (12.8 to 14.8%) than it was for Listeria (26.5 to 31.4%). The shrimp carapace was found to be hydrophobic (θ = 74.5°), and a significant (P<0.05) difference in surface roughness between carapace types was noted. There was a linear correlation between bacterial cell surface charge (r = 0.95) and hydrophobicity (r = 0.85) and initial attachment (P<0.05) of Listeria and Salmonella to carapaces. However, the same properties could not be related to subsequent colonization.
Formatted abstract
Listeria and Salmonella are important foodborne pathogens normally associated with the shrimp production chain. This study investigated the potential of Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Senftenberg, and Listeria monocytogenes (Scott A and V7) to attach to and colonize shrimp carapace. Attachment and colonization of Listeria and Salmonella were demonstrated. Shrimp abdominal carapaces showed higher levels of bacterial attachment (P < 0.05) than did head carapaces. Listeria consistently exhibited greater attachment (P < 0.05) than did Salmonella on all surfaces. Chitinase activity of all strains was tested and found not to occur at the three temperatures (10, 25, and 37°C) tested. The surface physicochemical properties of bacterial cells and shrimp carapace were studied to determine their role in attachment and colonization. Salmonella had significantly (P < 0.05) more positive (−3.9 and −6.0 mV) cell surface charge than Listeria (−18 and −22.8 mV) had. Both bacterial species were found to be hydrophilic (<35%) when measured by the bacterial adherence to hydrocarbon method and by contact angle (θ) measurements (Listeria, 21.3 and 24.8°, and Salmonella, 14.5 and 18.9°). The percentage of cells retained by Phenyl-Sepharose was lower for Salmonella (12.8 to 14.8%) than it was for Listeria (26.5 to 31.4%). The shrimp carapace was found to be hydrophobic (θ = 74.5°), and a significant (P < 0.05) difference in surface roughness between carapace types was noted. There was a linear correlation between bacterial cell surface charge (r2 = 0.95) and hydrophobicity (r2 = 0.85) and initial attachment (P < 0.05) of Listeria and Salmonella to carapaces. However, the same properties could not be related to subsequent colonization.
Copyright © International Association for Food Protection.
Keyword Cell-surface charge
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:59:41 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences