Issues in determining factors influencing bacterial attachment: A review using the attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces as an example

Goulter, R. M., Gentle, I. R. and Dykes, G. A. (2009) Issues in determining factors influencing bacterial attachment: A review using the attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces as an example. Letters In Applied Microbiology, 49 1: 1-7. doi:10.1111/j.1472-765X.2009.02591.x


Author Goulter, R. M.
Gentle, I. R.
Dykes, G. A.
Title Issues in determining factors influencing bacterial attachment: A review using the attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces as an example
Formatted title
Issues in determining factors influencing bacterial attachment: A review using the attachment of Escherichia coli to abiotic surfaces as an example
Journal name Letters In Applied Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0266-8254
1472-765X
Publication date 2009-07-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1472-765X.2009.02591.x
Open Access Status
Volume 49
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Editor Jean-Yves Maillard
Place of publication London, U.K
Publisher Blackwell
Language eng
Subject C1
060501 Bacteriology
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
Abstract An understanding of the mechanisms which facilitate the attachment of Escherichia coli and other bacterial species to abiotic surfaces is desired by numerous industries including the food and medical industries. Numerous studies have attempted to explain bacterial attachment as a function of bacterial properties such as cellular surface charge, hydrophobicity and outer membrane proteins amongst others. Conflicting evidence in the literature both for and against a positive relationship may arise from the nature of the test methods used to measure them. A handful of recent studies utilizing technologies such as atomic force microscopy have begun to look at bacterial attachment at a single cell and molecular level. These studies may provide the information required to fully understand the underlying factors which influence bacterial cell attachment to abiotic surfaces. A number of issues in determining the influential factors of bacterial attachment have been identified from the literature: a lack of standardization and sensitivity of methods, as well as the value of measuring bulk properties of a number of cells rather than the behaviour of single cells which may overlook key interactions at a molecular level. These issues will need to be addressed in future studies in this area.
Formatted abstract
An understanding of the mechanisms which facilitate the attachment of Escherichia coli and other bacterial species to abiotic surfaces is desired by numerous industries including the food and medical industries. Numerous studies have attempted to explain bacterial attachment as a function of bacterial properties such as cellular surface charge, hydrophobicity and outer membrane proteins amongst others. Conflicting evidence in the literature both for and against a positive relationship may arise from the nature of the test methods used to measure them. A handful of recent studies utilizing technologies such as atomic force microscopy have begun to look at bacterial attachment at a single cell and molecular level. These studies may provide the information required to fully understand the underlying factors which influence bacterial cell attachment to abiotic surfaces. A number of issues in determining the influential factors of bacterial attachment have been identified from the literature: a lack of standardization and sensitivity of methods, as well as the value of measuring bulk properties of a number of cells rather than the behaviour of single cells which may overlook key interactions at a molecular level. These issues will need to be addressed in future studies in this area.
© 2009 The Authors
Journal compilation © 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology,
Keyword Abiotic surfaces
Bacterial attachment
Cellular surface charge
Escherichia coli
Hydrophobicity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:59:16 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences