Perceived need for mental health care: Findings from the 2007 Australian Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing

Meadows, Graham N. and Burgess, Philip M. (2009) Perceived need for mental health care: Findings from the 2007 Australian Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 43 7: 624-634. doi:10.1080/00048670902970866


Author Meadows, Graham N.
Burgess, Philip M.
Title Perceived need for mental health care: Findings from the 2007 Australian Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00048670902970866
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 43
Issue 7
Start page 624
End page 634
Total pages 11
Editor Peter Joyce
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Language eng
Subject 1702 Cognitive Sciences
1103 Clinical Sciences
C1
1117 Public Health and Health Services
9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
Abstract Objectives: To provide an overview of perceived need for mental health care and response of services to those needs as assessed by the general Australian adult population. Method: The Perceived Need for Care Questionnaire was administered to respondents of the Australian 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. This instrument allows for self assessment of needs for five kinds of intervention from mental health services as needed in the last year. Specific needs assessed included: medication, information, counselling including psychotherapy, social interventions and skills training: Needs for care may be rated as unmet, partially met and met. Results: Approximately 14% of the population perceived a need for mental health care and between 7% and 8% perceived a met need for either counselling or medication. Need for care was less likely to be perceived by people with substance use disorders than among those with anxiety or affective disorders. For just under half of the population with perceived need (45%), all perceived needs were rated as met, and for around one in five of those with perceived needs, none of their perceived needs were met. Proportionally, needs for medication are most likely to be rated as met at 84%, needs for counselling and information are met at a rate of between 50% and 60%, skills training approximately 40%, and social interventions needs are those least likely to be rated as fully met, at 25%. Conclusions: Mental health care is delivered in large volume and often with high levels of acceptability to the Australian community, although major gaps still remain. It appears that the disparity between need and care may be proportionally larger in the areas described as skills training and social interventions than areas outside of conventional mental health service domains of provision and medication and psychotherapy or counselling.
Keyword Australia
Quality of life
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:57:51 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Public Health