Dose-response assay templates for in vitro assessment of resistance to benzimidazole and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drugs in human hookworms

Kotze, Andrew C., Lowe, Ann, O'Grady, John, Kopp, Steven R. and Behnke, Jerzy M. (2009) Dose-response assay templates for in vitro assessment of resistance to benzimidazole and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drugs in human hookworms. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 81 1: 163-170.

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Author Kotze, Andrew C.
Lowe, Ann
O'Grady, John
Kopp, Steven R.
Behnke, Jerzy M.
Title Dose-response assay templates for in vitro assessment of resistance to benzimidazole and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drugs in human hookworms
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
1476-1645
Publication date 2009-07-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 81
Issue 1
Start page 163
End page 170
Total pages 8
Place of publication Deerfield, IL, United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Language eng
Subject 2405 Parasitology
2725 Infectious Diseases
2406 Virology
Abstract With the implementation of mass drug administration programs for the control of human hookworms, there is a need to monitor for the emergence of drug resistance. We have therefore examined in vitro assays for monitoring sensitivity to benzimidazoles (egg hatch assay) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drugs (motility and morphology assays), with a view to developing tools for monitoring drug sensitivity in the field. We have performed assays with Necator americanus and Ancylostoma ceylanicum, and combined this with published data on N. americanus and Ancylostoma caninum, to indicate he breadth of the responses of various hookworm species and isolates in these in vitro assays. This has allowed us to generate assay templates covering the known range of responses, with scope to cover any shift in response that may be indicative of resistance. These assays will have immediate applicability in monitoring for the emergence of drug resistance in human hookworm populations.
Formatted abstract
With the implementation of mass drug administration programs for the control of  human hookworms, there is a need to monitor for the emergence of drug resistance. We have therefore examined in vitro assays for monitoring sensitivity to benzimidazoles (egg hatch assay) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist drugs (motility and morphology assays), with a view to developing tools for monitoring drug sensitivity in the field. We have performed assays with Necator americanus and Ancylostoma ceylanicum , and combined this with published data on N. americanus and Ancylostoma caninum , to indicate the breadth of the responses of various hookworm species and isolates in these in vitro assays. This has allowed us to generate assay templates covering the known range of responses, with scope to cover any shift in response that may be indicative of resistance. These assays will have immediate applicability in monitoring for the emergence of drug resistance in human hookworm populations.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Tropical Medicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Tropical Medicine
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SCI
TROPICAL MEDICINE
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:54:58 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Veterinary Science