The oldest and longest enduring microlithic sequence in India: 35 000 years of modern human occupation and change at the Jwalapuram Locality 9 rockshelter

Clarkson, Chris, Petraglia, Michael, Korisettar, Ravi, Haslam, Michael, Boivin, Nicole, Crowther, Alison, Ditchfield, Peter, Fuller, Dorian, Miracle, Preston, Harris, Clair, Connell, Kate, James, Hannah and Koshy, Jinu (2009) The oldest and longest enduring microlithic sequence in India: 35 000 years of modern human occupation and change at the Jwalapuram Locality 9 rockshelter. Antiquity, 83 320: 326-348. doi:10.1017/S0003598X0009846X

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Clarkson, Chris
Petraglia, Michael
Korisettar, Ravi
Haslam, Michael
Boivin, Nicole
Crowther, Alison
Ditchfield, Peter
Fuller, Dorian
Miracle, Preston
Harris, Clair
Connell, Kate
James, Hannah
Koshy, Jinu
Title The oldest and longest enduring microlithic sequence in India: 35 000 years of modern human occupation and change at the Jwalapuram Locality 9 rockshelter
Journal name Antiquity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-598X
1745-1744
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0003598X0009846X
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 83
Issue 320
Start page 326
End page 348
Total pages 23
Place of publication York, U.K.
Publisher Antiquity Publications
Language eng
Subject 3302 Archaeology
1200 Arts and Humanities
Abstract The Jwalapuram Locality 9 rockshelter in southern India dates back to 35 000 years ago and it is emerging as one of the key sites for documenting human activity and behaviour in South Asia. The excavated assemblage includes a proliferation of lithic artefacts, beads, worked bone and fragments of a human cranium. The industry is microlithic in character, establishing Jwalapuram 9 as one of the oldest and most important sites of its kind in South Asia.
Formatted abstract
The Jwalapuram Locality 9 rockshelter in southern India dates back to 35 000 years ago and it is emerging as one of the key sites for documenting human activity and behaviour in South Asia. The excavated assemblage includes a proliferation of lithic artefacts, beads, worked bone and fragments of a human cranium. The industry is microlithic in character, establishing Jwalapuram 9 as one of the oldest and most important sites of its kind in South Asia.
Keyword India
Human-behavior
LGM
Microblade
Microlithic
Middle Palaeolithic
Terminal Pleistocene
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 53 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 64 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:54:54 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Social Science