The Life Control Scale: Validation with a Population Cohort of Middle-Aged Australian Women

Lee, Christina, Ford, Jess and Gramotnev, Helen (2009) The Life Control Scale: Validation with a Population Cohort of Middle-Aged Australian Women. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 16 2: 148-157. doi:10.1007/s12529-008-9013-5

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Author Lee, Christina
Ford, Jess
Gramotnev, Helen
Title The Life Control Scale: Validation with a Population Cohort of Middle-Aged Australian Women
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1070-5503
1532-7558
Publication date 2009-06-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-008-9013-5
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 16
Issue 2
Start page 148
End page 157
Total pages 10
Editor Joost Dekker
Place of publication United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being)
Abstract Background The concept of perceived control is central to many theories of physical and emotional well-being. However, existing measures are lengthy and generally focus on job control. In epidemiological research, brief measures and those which can be applied across entire populations are needed. Among women in particular, a substantial minority have no paid work, while most also have major unpaid family commitments which may affect well-being through their effect on control. Thus, we evaluated the six-item Life Control Scale (Bobak, Soc Sci Med. 47:269–79, 1998) with a population-based sample of middle-aged women. Method A population-based sample of 11,223 women aged 50 to 55, participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, completed the Life Control Scale as part of an omnibus survey of health and psychosocial factors. Results The scale was demonstrated to be unifactorial and internally reliable and to show the expected relationships with several measures of socioeconomic position, physical health, and mental health. Conclusion The Life Control Scale is brief, valid, and broadly applicable in epidemiological research.
Formatted abstract
Background The concept of perceived control is central to many theories of physical and emotional well-being. However, existing measures are lengthy and generally focus on job control. In epidemiological research, brief measures and those which can be applied across entire populations are needed. Among women in particular, a substantial minority have no paid work, while most also have major unpaid family commitments which may affect well-being through their effect on control. Thus, we evaluated the six-item Life Control Scale (Bobak, Soc Sci Med. 47:269–79, 1998) with a population-based sample of middle-aged women.
Method A population-based sample of 11,223 women aged 50 to 55, participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health, completed the Life Control Scale as part of an omnibus survey of health and psychosocial factors.
Results The scale was demonstrated to be unifactorial and internally reliable and to show the expected relationships with several measures of socioeconomic position, physical health, and mental health.
Conclusion The Life Control Scale is brief, valid, and broadly applicable in epidemiological research.
Keyword Perceived control
Women
Physical health
Mental health
Socioeconomic position
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:50:57 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology