Stability of coral-endosymbiont associations during and after a thermal stress event in the southern Great Barrier Reef

Stat, M, Loh, WKW, LaJeunesse, TC, Hoegh-Guldberg, O and Carter, DA (2009) Stability of coral-endosymbiont associations during and after a thermal stress event in the southern Great Barrier Reef. CORAL REEFS, 28 3: 709-713. doi:10.1007/s00338-009-0509-5


Author Stat, M
Loh, WKW
LaJeunesse, TC
Hoegh-Guldberg, O
Carter, DA
Title Stability of coral-endosymbiont associations during and after a thermal stress event in the southern Great Barrier Reef
Journal name CORAL REEFS   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0722-4028
Publication date 2009-09-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00338-009-0509-5
Open Access Status
Volume 28
Issue 3
Start page 709
End page 713
Total pages 5
Editor Barbara E. Brown
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
060409 Molecular Evolution
960399 Climate and Climate Change not elsewhere classified
Abstract Shifts in the community of symbiotic dinoflagellates to those that are better suited to the prevailing environmental condition may provide reef-building corals with a rapid mechanism by which to adapt to changes in the environment. In this study, the dominant Symbiodinium in 10 coral species in the southern Great Barrier Reef was monitored over a 1-year period in 2002 that coincided with a thermal stress event. Molecular genetic profiling of Symbiodinium communities using single strand conformational polymorphism of the large subunit rDNA and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the internal transcribed spacer 2 region did not detect any changes in the communities during and after this thermal-stress event. Coral colonies of seven species bleached but recovered with their original symbionts. This study suggests that the shuffling or switching of symbionts in response to thermal stress may be restricted to certain coral species and is probably not a universal feature of the coral-symbiont relationship.
Formatted abstract
Shifts in the community of symbiotic dinoflagellates
to those that are better suited to the prevailing
environmental condition may provide reef-building corals
with a rapid mechanism by which to adapt to changes in the
environment. In this study, the dominant Symbiodinium in 10
coral species in the southern Great Barrier Reef was monitored
over a 1-year period in 2002 that coincided with a
thermal stress event. Molecular genetic profiling of Symbiodinium
communities using single strand conformational
polymorphism of the large subunit rDNA and denaturing
gradient gel electrophoresis of the internal transcribed spacer
2 region did not detect any changes in the communities
during and after this thermal-stress event. Coral colonies of
seven species bleached but recovered with their original
symbionts. This study suggests that the shuffling or switching
of symbionts in response to thermal stress may be
restricted to certain coral species and is probably not a
universal feature of the coral–symbiont relationship.
Keyword Coral
BLEACHING EVENT
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID A10009205
204-53
OCE-0137007
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Centre for Marine Studies Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 49 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:46:11 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies