Geographic variation in the prevalence of overweight and economic status in Chinese adults

Zhuo, Q, Wang, ZQ, Piao, JH, Ma, GS, Zhai, FY, He, YN and Yang, XG (2009) Geographic variation in the prevalence of overweight and economic status in Chinese adults. BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 102 3: 413-418. doi:10.1017/S0007114508184732

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Author Zhuo, Q
Wang, ZQ
Piao, JH
Ma, GS
Zhai, FY
He, YN
Yang, XG
Title Geographic variation in the prevalence of overweight and economic status in Chinese adults
Journal name BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1145
Publication date 2009-08-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0007114508184732
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 102
Issue 3
Start page 413
End page 418
Total pages 6
Editor P C Calder
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject C1
9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health)
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract China is experiencing a rapid increase in overweight and related conditions. This study describes the geographic variation in BMI levels and the prevalence of overweight and underweight in Chinese adults, and assesses their relations with regional Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita levels. BMI values and the prevalence of overweight and underweight in 143 522 adults from the Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey (2002) were calculated according to geographic regions in China. Their correlations with GDP were assessed. Linear and logistic regressions were used to adjust for age, sex and city–country composition. BMI and the prevalence of overweight were highest in the Bohai coastal regions while lowest in southern provinces such as Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Hunan and Fujian. Mean BMI values ranged from 20·72 to 25·48 kg/m2, and the prevalence of overweight ranged from 6·6 to 53·9 %. BMI and the prevalence of overweight were positively correlated with economic development, particularly in the northern regions. However, for regions with similar GDP per capita levels, those in the south had substantially lower BMI and lower prevalence of overweight than those in the north. Interestingly, some southern regions with high GDP per capita had low BMI and low prevalence of overweight. The prevalence of underweight was highest in the south. Substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of overweight and underweight exist in China. Such variations cannot be fully explained by the differences in economic status. China is currently facing challenges of both overweight and underweight but priorities vary in different regions.
Formatted abstract
China is experiencing a rapid increase in overweight and related conditions. This study describes the geographic variation in BMI levels and the prevalence of overweight and underweight in Chinese adults, and assesses their relations with regional Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita levels. BMI values and the prevalence of overweight and underweight in 143 522 adults from the Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey (2002) were calculated according to geographic regions in China. Their correlations with GDP were assessed. Linear and logistic regressions were used to adjust for age, sex and city–country composition. BMI and the prevalence of overweight were highest in the Bohai coastal regions while lowest in southern provinces such as Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Hunan and Fujian. Mean BMI values ranged from 20·72 to 25·48 kg/m2, and the prevalence of overweight ranged from 6·6 to 53·9 %. BMI and the prevalence of overweight were positively correlated with economic development, particularly in the northern regions. However, for regions with similar GDP per capita levels, those in the south had substantially lower BMI and lower prevalence of overweight than those in the north. Interestingly, some southern regions with high GDP per capita had low BMI and low prevalence of overweight. The prevalence of underweight was highest in the south. Substantial geographic variations in the prevalence of overweight and underweight exist in China. Such variations cannot be fully explained by the differences in economic status. China is currently facing challenges of both overweight and underweight but priorities vary in different regions.

Keyword Overweight
OBESITY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 2001DEA30035
511013
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:44:27 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital