Grazing rates of Elysia tomentosa on native and introduced Caulerpa taxifolia

Burfeind, DD, Tibbetts, IR and Udy, JW (2009) Grazing rates of Elysia tomentosa on native and introduced Caulerpa taxifolia. HYDROBIOLOGIA, 632 1: 355-358. doi:10.1007/s10750-009-9845-2


Author Burfeind, DD
Tibbetts, IR
Udy, JW
Title Grazing rates of Elysia tomentosa on native and introduced Caulerpa taxifolia
Formatted title
Grazing rates of Elysia tomentosa on native and introduced Caulerpa taxifolia
Journal name HYDROBIOLOGIA   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0018-8158
1573-5117
Publication date 2009-10-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10750-009-9845-2
Open Access Status
Volume 632
Issue 1
Start page 355
End page 358
Total pages 4
Editor Koen Martens
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Subject C1
960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060808 Invertebrate Biology
Abstract The marine alga Caulerpa taxifolia Vahl (C. Agardh), recognized globally as one of the most prolific non-native species introductions, has been introduced to several temperate locations from where it has since rapidly expanded. C. taxifolia is protected by a toxin (terpenoid) in its tissues that limits grazing by native herbivores. Sacoglossan molluscs of the genus Elysia are among the few organisms that graze C. taxifolia; however, little is known about their feeding ecology. In the current study, we quantified the grazing rates of Elysia tomentosa on native C. taxifolia (Moreton Bay, Queensland) and introduced C. taxifolia (Botany Bay and Lake Conjola, New South Wales). Grazing rates were similar at Moreton Bay sites and Botany Bay; however, they were significantly lower in Lake Conjola. At the maximum observed grazing rate, slugs ate their body weight in C. taxifolia (dry weight) every 18-24 h. Differences in grazing rates between locations may be explained by differences in C. taxifolia morphology rather than native or introduced origin.
Formatted abstract
The marine alga Caulerpa taxifolia Vahl (C. Agardh), recognized globally as one of the most prolific non-native species introductions, has been introduced to several temperate locations from where it has since rapidly expanded. C. taxifolia is protected by a toxin (terpenoid) in its tissues that limits grazing by native herbivores. Sacoglossan molluscs of the genus Elysia are among the few organisms that graze C. taxifolia; however, little is known about their feeding ecology. In the current study, we quantified the grazing rates of Elysia tomentosa on native C. taxifolia (Moreton Bay, Queensland) and introduced C. taxifolia (Botany Bay and Lake Conjola, New South Wales). Grazing rates were similar at Moreton Bay sites and Botany Bay; however, they were significantly lower in Lake Conjola. At the maximum observed grazing rate, slugs ate their body weight in C. taxifolia (dry weight) every 18–24 h. Differences in grazing rates between locations may be explained by differences in C. taxifolia morphology rather than native or introduced origin.
Keyword Elysia tomentosa
Grazing
Introduced species
Caulerpa taxifolia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 17:44:16 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies