Mental health well-being amongst fathers within the Pacific Island Families Study

Tautolo, El-Shadan, Schluter, Philip J. and Sundborn, Gerhard (2009) Mental health well-being amongst fathers within the Pacific Island Families Study. Pacific Health Dialog, 15 1: 69-78.


Author Tautolo, El-Shadan
Schluter, Philip J.
Sundborn, Gerhard
Title Mental health well-being amongst fathers within the Pacific Island Families Study
Formatted title
Mental health well-being amongst fathers within the Pacific Island Families Study
Journal name Pacific Health Dialog   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1015-7867
Publication date 2009-02-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 78
Total pages 10
Editor Sitaleki A Finau
Place of publication Cook Islands
Publisher Health Research Council of the Pacific Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
321204 Mental Health
920308 Pacific Peoples Health - Health Status and Outcomes
920410 Mental Health
Abstract This article investigates the prevalence of potential psychological disorder amongst a cohort of primarily Pacific fathers in New Zealand over their child's first 6-years of life. The analysis is based on data collected at 12-months, 2-years and 6-years postpartum during the Pacific Islands Families Study, and uses the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12) to assess the prevalence of psychological distress amongst participant fathers at each measurement wave. Various sociodemographic and potentially confounding variables were also investigated to determine their effect on the risk of developing potential mental health disorder. The majority of fathers within the study reported good overall health and well-being and their prevalence of 'symptomatic' disorder was initially low at 12-months (3.90%) but increased significantly at 2-years (6.6%) and at 6-years (9.80%) in crude and adjusted analyses (both P-values < 0.001). In the adjusted analysis, the odds of symptomatic cases at 2-years was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.8) times that observed at 12-months postpartum and at 6-years the odds was 3.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.9, 5.2) times that observed at 12-months. Moreover in the adjusted analysis, smoking status, marital status, employment status, and ethnicity, were all significantly associated with the risk of developing symptomatic mental health disorder.
Formatted abstract
This article investigates the prevalence of potential psychological disorder amongst a cohort of primarily Pacific fathers in New Zealand over their child's first 6-years of life. The analysis is based on data collected at 12-months, 2-years and 6-years postpartum during the Pacific Islands Families Study, and uses the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12) to assess the prevalence of psychological distress amongst participant fathers at each measurement wave. Various sociodemographic and potentially confounding variables were also investigated to determine their effect on the risk of developing potential mental health disorder. The majority of fathers within the study reported good overall health and well-being and their prevalence of 'symptomatic' disorder was initially low at 12-months (3.90%) but increased significantly at 2-years (6.6%) and at 6-years (9.80%) in crude and adjusted analyses (both P-values < 0.001). In the adjusted analysis, the odds of symptomatic cases at 2-years was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 2.8) times that observed at 12-months postpartum and at 6-years the odds was 3.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.9, 5.2) times that observed at 12-months. Moreover in the adjusted analysis, smoking status, marital status, employment status, and ethnicity, were all significantly associated with the risk of developing symptomatic mental health disorder.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 26 Aug 2009, 19:30:25 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work