Pacific islands families: Child and parental physical activity and body size — design and methodology

Oliver, Melody, Schluter, Philip J., Paterson, Janis, Kolt, Gregory S. and Schofield, Grant M. (2009) Pacific islands families: Child and parental physical activity and body size — design and methodology. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 122 1298: 48-58.

Author Oliver, Melody
Schluter, Philip J.
Paterson, Janis
Kolt, Gregory S.
Schofield, Grant M.
Title Pacific islands families: Child and parental physical activity and body size — design and methodology
Journal name The New Zealand Medical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1175-8716
Publication date 2009-07-03
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 122
Issue 1298
Start page 48
End page 58
Total pages 11
Editor Frank Frizelle
Place of publication Christchurch, New Zealand
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Language eng
Subject C1
111706 Epidemiology
111715 Pacific Peoples Health
920307 Pacific Peoples Health - Determinants of Health
321207 Indigenous Health
Formatted abstract
Aim
To objectively assess physical activity (PA) and body size in 6-year-old  children and their mothers participating in the Pacific Islands Families (PIF) cohort study, and to identify factors potentially related to PA and body size in Pacific children.

Methods
The PIF cohort was drawn from live births at Middlemore Hospital (South Auckland, New Zealand) in 2000. Information has been collected at birth, 6 weeks, 12 and 24 months, and 4 and 6 years postpartum. At 6 years, the Child and Parental Physical Activity and Body Size (PIF:PAC) study was simultaneously conducted and measures of child and mother PA (8-day accelerometry), body size (waist circumference, body mass index), and PA supports and barriers (questionnaire) taken.

Results
254 mothers and their children took part in the PIF:PAC study. Usable accelerometer data were gathered for 173 mothers and 199 children over an average of 3–4 days. High levels of overweight and obesity were found in boys, girls, and mothers (62%, 58%, and 97% overweight or obese, respectively).

Conclusion
Strategies for obesity reduction in Pacific populations are urgently required. Combined, the PIF and PIF:PAC studies will provide vital information for understanding and targeting the obesity epidemic in Pacific children.
Keyword Pacific Island
physical activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Aug 2009, 23:28:45 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work