Exploring Actical Accelerometers as an Objective Measure of Physical Activity in People With Multiple Sclerosis

Kayes, Nicole M., Schluter, Philip J., McPherson, Kathryn M., Leete, Marta, Mawston, Grant and Taylor, Denise (2009) Exploring Actical Accelerometers as an Objective Measure of Physical Activity in People With Multiple Sclerosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 90 4: 594-601. doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2008.10.012


Author Kayes, Nicole M.
Schluter, Philip J.
McPherson, Kathryn M.
Leete, Marta
Mawston, Grant
Taylor, Denise
Title Exploring Actical Accelerometers as an Objective Measure of Physical Activity in People With Multiple Sclerosis
Formatted title
Exploring Actical Accelerometers as an Objective Measure of Physical Activity in People With Multiple Sclerosis
Journal name Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-9993
Publication date 2009-04-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.apmr.2008.10.012
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 90
Issue 4
Start page 594
End page 601
Total pages 8
Editor Dr Kenneth M Jaffe
Place of publication United States
Publisher W B Saunders Co
Language eng
Subject C1
920403 Disability and Functional Capacity
920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
Abstract To evaluate the validity of the ActiGraph accelerometer (AG) to differentiate between standardized, physical activity tasks using oxygen consumption ((Equation is included in full-text article.)O2) as the criterion measure in children and adolescents with an acquired brain injury; to determine vector magnitude activity intensity cut-points; to compare performance of cut-points to previously published cut-points.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and psychometric
properties of Actical accelerometers in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).
Design: Participants attended 2 testing sessions 7 days apart in which they completed 6 activities ranging in intensity while wearing an Actical accelerometer and Polar heart rate monitor. Perceived exertion was recorded after each activity.

Setting:
University research center.
Participants: People (N=31) with a definite diagnosis of MS were purposefully selected, aiming for diversity in level of reported disability, age, sex, and type of MS.

Interventions: Not applicable.
Main Outcome Measures: Actical accelerometer, Polar S810i and RS800sd heart rate monitors, Borg rating of perceived exertion, six-minute walk test (6MWT), 30-second chair stand test.

Results:
Accelerometers had good feasibility and acceptability in people with MS. Test-retest reliability was poor for sedentary and free-living activities, with low to moderate intraclass correlation coefficients (.00 –.75), but was better for more vigorous or rhythmic activities (.85–.90). Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement for average accelerometer counts
were wide, ranging from +/-16 (newspaper reading) to +/-1330 (6MWT). Validity was not established with 95% prediction intervals showing high variability for all activities.

Conclusions:
The psychometric problems highlighted here suggest Actical accelerometers should be used with caution in people with MS as a measure of physical activity, particularly when measuring comparatively sedentary or free-living activities.
Keyword activities of daily living
exercise
movement
multiple sclerosis
rehabilittion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 25 Aug 2009, 01:18:14 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work