Self-sufficiency in intern supply: The impact of expanded medical schools, medical places and rural clinical schools in Queensland

Eley, Diann S., Zhang, Jianzhen and Wilkinson, David (2009) Self-sufficiency in intern supply: The impact of expanded medical schools, medical places and rural clinical schools in Queensland. Australian Health Review, 33 3: 472-477. doi:10.1071/AH090472


Author Eley, Diann S.
Zhang, Jianzhen
Wilkinson, David
Title Self-sufficiency in intern supply: The impact of expanded medical schools, medical places and rural clinical schools in Queensland
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2009-08-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH090472
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 33
Issue 3
Start page 472
End page 477
Total pages 6
Editor Stephen Duckett
Place of publication Sydney, Australia
Publisher Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association
Language eng
Subject C1
11 Medical and Health Sciences
1399 Other Education
Abstract Objective: The doctor shortage in Australia generally, and the rural shortage in particular, has led to an increase in medical schools, medical places and rural training. If effective, these strategies will first impact on the intern workforce. We studied the source of interns in Queensland.
Formatted abstract
Objective: The doctor shortage in Australia generally, and the rural shortage in particular, has led to an increase in medical schools, medical places and rural training. If effective, these strategies will first impact on the intern workforce. We studied the source of interns in Queensland.

Methods:
Analysis of number, source and location of interns by Rural, Remote and Metropolitan Area (RRMA) classification (an index of remoteness) from university and health department records (2003-2008). Odds ratios compared the likelihood of intern supply from Queensland universities and rural clinical schools.

Results:
Most interns in Queensland graduated from Queensland universities in 2007 (287 [72%]) and 2008 (344 [84%]). Proportions increased across all three RRMA groups from: 82% to 93% in RRMA1; 56% to 68% in RRMA2 and 67% to 79% in RRMA3. The University of Queensland (UQ) provides most interns in all RRMA locations including RRMA3, and this increased from 2007 (n = 33 [35%]) to 2008 (n = 57 [58%]). Interns from interstate decreased from 61 (15%) in 2007 to 40 (10%) in 2008. Interns from overseas fell from 53 (13%) in 2007 to 27 (7%) in 2008. Rural clinical schools compared with traditional urban-based schools were more likely to supply interns to RRMA3 than RRMA1 hospitals in 2007 (OR, 8.8; 95% CI, 4.6-16.7; P< 0.0001) and 2008 (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 3.5-12.2; P< 0.0001).

Conclusions: Queensland is close to self-sufficiency in intern supply and will achieve this in the next few years. Rural clinical schools are playing an important role in producing interns for RRMA3 hospitals. Due to its large cohort, UQ remains the major provider across all RRMA groups.
Keyword Rural health
Interns
Effective Workforce Strategy
Career Interest
University
Choice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 18 Aug 2009, 01:10:25 EST by Erin Bowly on behalf of Rural Clinical School - South West Qld Region