Regional differences among employed nurses: A Queensland study

Henwood, Tim, Eley, Robert, Parker, Deborah, Tuckett, Anthony and Hegney, Desley (2009) Regional differences among employed nurses: A Queensland study. The Australian Journal of Rural Health, 17 4: 201-207. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1584.2009.01072.x


Author Henwood, Tim
Eley, Robert
Parker, Deborah
Tuckett, Anthony
Hegney, Desley
Title Regional differences among employed nurses: A Queensland study
Formatted title
Regional differences among employed nurses: A Queensland study
Journal name The Australian Journal of Rural Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1038-5282
Publication date 2009-08-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1584.2009.01072.x
Open Access Status
Volume 17
Issue 4
Start page 201
End page 207
Total pages 7
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject C1
321199 Nursing not elsewhere classified
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
111717 Primary Health Care
120505 Regional Analysis and Development
920401 Behaviour and Health
920506 Rural Health
920505 Occupational Health
Abstract Objective:
Formatted abstract
Objective: To ascertain differences in the working lives of geographically dispersed nurses.

Design:
Cross-sectional.

Setting: Registered, enrolled and assistants-in-nursing members of the Queensland Nurses’ Union employed in nursing in Queensland, Australia.
Participants: A total of 3000 members of the Union, equally stratified by sector (public, private, aged care). Among them, 1192 responded and 1039 supplied postcodes matching the Australian Standard Geographical

Classification:
Main outcome measures: Statistically significant differences
in working lives of nurses employed in different geographical locations.

Results:
Nurses in outer regional/remote/very remote localities are more likely to be employed as permanent full-time staff and self-report higher levels of work stress. These levels could be explained by: lack of
replacement staff for leave, longer working and on call hours and lack of support for new staff. Distance remains a major barrier to accessing continuing professional education. However, outer regional/remote/very
remote nurses were more likely to be provided employer support for professional education. Inner regional nurses were more likely to work part time, would work more hours if offered and were more likely to have taken
a break from nursing as a result of family commitments.

Conclusion:
The data confirm that current policies are not addressing the differences in the working lives of geographically dispersed nurses. Policies addressing orientation, mentoring and workloads should be implemented to address these issues.
Keyword nursing
regional
remote
rural
working life
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 01 Aug 2009, 00:54:07 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work