Parent influences on preschoolers' objectively assessed physical activity

Oliver, Melody, Schofield, Grant M. and Schluter, Philip J. (2010) Parent influences on preschoolers' objectively assessed physical activity. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13 4: 403-409. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2009.05.008


Author Oliver, Melody
Schofield, Grant M.
Schluter, Philip J.
Title Parent influences on preschoolers' objectively assessed physical activity
Formatted title
Parent influences on preschoolers’ objectively assessed physical activity
Journal name Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-2440
1878-1861
Publication date 2010-07-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2009.05.008
Open Access Status
Volume 13
Issue 4
Start page 403
End page 409
Total pages 7
Editor Gregory Kolt
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
920501 Child Health
111706 Epidemiology
111716 Preventive Medicine
Abstract The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between accelerometer-derived physical activity (PA) in preschoolers and their parents, and to investigate other potential child and parental associates of child PA. Families of children aged 2-5 yrs were recruited in Auckland, New Zealand, from October 2006 to July 2007. Consenting children and parents had their height, weight, and waist circumference measured and were asked to wear accelerometers over 7 consecutive days, measuring PA in 15. s epochs. Accelerometer data were gathered from 78 children, 62 mothers and 20 fathers over a median of 6.5-7 days, and converted to estimated daily PA rates for each individual using negative binomial generalised estimating equation (GEE) modelling. Potential associates of children's daily PA rates were then assessed using normal GEE models with exchangeable correlation structures. After taking account of all factors in the final multivariable model, parental PA rates (coefficient 0.09, 95% CI 0.03, 0.16, P=0.01) and child age (coefficient 0.11, 95% CI 0.01, 0.21, P=0.03) were the only factors significantly associated with child PA rates. Younger children may stand to benefit from PA intervention, and encouraging parental involvement in preschool PA interventions may be useful for increasing PA levels in young children. More work in this field is needed to corroborate these findings, improve generalisability, and determine causality.
Formatted abstract
The purposes of this study were to examine the relationship between accelerometer-derived physical activity (PA) in preschoolers and their parents, and to investigate other potential child and parental associates of child PA. Families of children aged 2–5 yrs were recruited in Auckland, New Zealand, from October 2006 to July 2007. Consenting children and parents had their height, weight, and waist circumference measured and were asked to wear accelerometers over 7 consecutive days, measuring PA in 15 s epochs. Accelerometer data were gathered from 78 children, 62 mothers and 20 fathers over a median of 6.5–7 days, and converted to estimated daily PA rates for each individual using negative binomial generalised estimating equation (GEE) modelling. Potential associates of children’s daily PA rates were then assessed using normal GEE models with exchangeable correlation structures. After taking account of all factors in the final multivariable model, parental PA rates (coefficient 0.09, 95% CI 0.03, 0.16, P = 0.01) and child age (coefficient 0.11, 95% CI 0.01, 0.21, P = 0.03) were the only factors significantly associated with child PArates.Younger children may stand to benefit from PAintervention, and encouraging parental involvement
in preschool PA interventions may be useful for increasing PA levels in young children. More work in this field is needed to corroborate these findings, improve generalisability, and determine causality.
© 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Accelerometer
Child behaviour
Child preschool
Measurement
Motor activity
Social environment
Total-energy expenditure
Young-children
Waist circumference
Environment
Childhood
Youth
Association
Overweight
Toddlers
Tracking
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 21 July 2009.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 01 Aug 2009, 00:21:44 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work