Interaction of human whole saliva and astringent dietary compounds investigated by interfacial shear rheology

Rossetti, D., Yakubov, G. E., Stokes, J. R., Williamson, A. M. and Fuller, G. G. (2008) Interaction of human whole saliva and astringent dietary compounds investigated by interfacial shear rheology. Food Hydrocolloids, 22 6: 1068-1078. doi:10.1016/j.foodhyd.2007.05.014


Author Rossetti, D.
Yakubov, G. E.
Stokes, J. R.
Williamson, A. M.
Fuller, G. G.
Title Interaction of human whole saliva and astringent dietary compounds investigated by interfacial shear rheology
Journal name Food Hydrocolloids   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-005X
Publication date 2008-08-01
Year available 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2007.05.014
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 22
Issue 6
Start page 1068
End page 1078
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 09 Engineering
Abstract Human whole saliva (HWS) is a complex physiological secretion that performs a number of essential functions such as protection of oral health, lubrication of mouth tissues, as well as predigestion of food. In addition, saliva forms the perireceptor environment of the oral cavity and, by its interactions with food and beverages, influences the transduction of aroma, taste and tactile (mouthfeel) perceptions. We investigate and report the impact of addition of compounds commonly found in oral health and beverage products (sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), citric acid and tea polyphenols: epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin (EC), rutin) on the interfacial shear elasticity of HWS obtained from a single subject. The aim of this work is to probe the relationship between surface shear elasticity of saliva and the astringent (puckering-like) mouthfeel arising from the consumption of products containing the investigated ingredients. Saliva proteins are extremely surface active and adsorb to the air-liquid interface to form a high-elastic "solid-like" surface film. Our findings show that the interfacial shear elasticity G of saliva is significantly reduced when mixed with citric acid, SDS or a tea polyphenol containing a galloyl ring in the molecule (EGCG). These results support the hypothesis that astringency arises from aggregation of salivary proteins, thereby reducing lubrication of oral tissues. Minor or no effect is observed from the interaction of saliva with EC or rutin. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of using mucins as a simple model for saliva. Two selected mucins, tested at different concentrations and ionic strength, failed to mimic the elastic interfacial behaviour shown by saliva. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Saliva
Interfacial rheology
Astringency
Polyphenols
SDS
Citric acid
Mucin
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Chemical Engineering Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 50 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 55 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 02 Jul 2009, 02:04:44 EST