A continent under stress: Interactions, feedbacks and risks associated with impact of modified land cover on Australia’s Climate

McAlpine, C. A., Syktus, J. I., Ryan, J. G., Deo, R. C., McKeon, G. M., McGowan, H. A. and Phinn, S. R. (2009) A continent under stress: Interactions, feedbacks and risks associated with impact of modified land cover on Australia’s Climate. Global Change Biology, 15 3: 2206-2223. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2009.01939.x


Author McAlpine, C. A.
Syktus, J. I.
Ryan, J. G.
Deo, R. C.
McKeon, G. M.
McGowan, H. A.
Phinn, S. R.
Title A continent under stress: Interactions, feedbacks and risks associated with impact of modified land cover on Australia’s Climate
Journal name Global Change Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-2486
1460-7212
Publication date 2009-03-24
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2009.01939.x
Open Access Status
Volume 15
Issue 3
Start page 2206
End page 2223
Total pages 18
Place of publication Oxford, UK
Publisher Blackwell
Language eng
Subject C1
970105 Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
0406 Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
Abstract Global climate change is the major and most urgent global environmental issue. Australia is already experiencing climate change as evidenced by higher temperatures and more frequent and severe droughts. These impacts are compounded by increasing land use pressures on natural resources and native ecosystems. This paper provides a synthesis of the interactions, feedbacks and risks of natural climate variability, climate change and land use/land cover change (LUCC) impacting on the Australian continent and how they vary regionally. We review evidence of climate change and underlying processes resulting from interactions between global warming caused by increased concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases and modification of the land surface. The consequences of ignoring the effect of LUCC on current and future droughts in Australia could have catastrophic consequences for the nation's environment, economy and communities. We highlight the need for more integrated, long-term and adaptive policies and regional natural resource management strategies that restore the beneficial feedbacks between native vegetation cover and local-regional climate, to help ameliorate the impact of global warming.
Keyword Anticipatory policy
Climate change
Drought
Ecosystem collapse
El Niño
Land cover change
Land surface feedbacks
Land use pressures
Landscape resilience
Tipping points
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID UQL29
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 20 Jun 2009, 02:09:12 EST by Dr Ravinesh Deo on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management