How Do Different Age Groups Use Benzodiazepines and Antidepressants?: Analysis of an Australian Administrative Database, 2003–6

Smith, Alesha and Tett, Sue E. (2009) How Do Different Age Groups Use Benzodiazepines and Antidepressants?: Analysis of an Australian Administrative Database, 2003–6. Drugs & Aging, 26 2: 113-122. doi:10.2165/0002512-200926020-00003


Author Smith, Alesha
Tett, Sue E.
Title How Do Different Age Groups Use Benzodiazepines and Antidepressants?: Analysis of an Australian Administrative Database, 2003–6
Journal name Drugs & Aging   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1170-229X
1179-1969
Publication date 2009-02-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2165/0002512-200926020-00003
Open Access Status
Volume 26
Issue 2
Start page 113
End page 122
Total pages 10
Editor R. Olney
Place of publication New Zealand
Publisher Adis International Ltd.
Language eng
Subject C1
111503 Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice
920208 Health Policy Evaluation
Abstract Background: The use of antidepressants and benzodiazepines is increasing in Australia and worldwide, and it is thought that some of the prescribing of these classes of drugs may be inappropriate. However, the demographic characteristics of the subgroups of the population responsible for this increase remain unexplored. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine changes in the utilization of antidepressants and benzodiazepines between different age groups within Australia from 2003 to 2006. Methods: The Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme administrative database was used to obtain dispensing data for all antidepressants and publicly subsidized benzodiazepines. Changes in utilization (amounts and patterns of use of different compounds) were compared between different age groups from 2003 to 2006. The WHO Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical/Defined Daily Dose system was used. Results: Use of antidepressants increased from 2003 to 2006, and in each year increased with age, with those >=65 years having the greatest use. Differences were seen in the antidepressant most utilized, with the elderly using more tricyclic antidepressants than those who are younger. The utilization of benzodiazepines decreased from 2003 to 2006 in elderly individuals and those receiving social welfare benefits. Individuals aged >=85 years had the highest use of benzodiazepines and used more long-acting benzodiazepines compared with those aged 35-44 years. Conclusion: The elderly still account for most use per capita of benzodiazepines. Some of this use may be inappropriate (e.g. use of long-acting benzodiazepines) and, hence, may represent a useful target for future educational intervention. The elderly also still account for the largest per capita use of antidepressants.
Keyword Inappropriate Medication Use
mass-media campaigns
drug utilization
General-practice
beers criteria
prevalence
depression
population
health
care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 19 Jun 2009, 21:59:18 EST by Charna Kovacevic on behalf of School of Pharmacy