Pregnancy Losses In Young Australian Women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

Herbert, Danielle, Lucke, Jayne C. and Dobson, Annette J. (2009) Pregnancy Losses In Young Australian Women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Women's Health Issues, 19 1: 21-29. doi:10.1016/j.whi.2008.08.007


Author Herbert, Danielle
Lucke, Jayne C.
Dobson, Annette J.
Title Pregnancy Losses In Young Australian Women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Journal name Women's Health Issues   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1049-3867
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.whi.2008.08.007
Open Access Status
Volume 19
Issue 1
Start page 21
End page 29
Total pages 9
Place of publication United States
Publisher Elsevier Inc.
Language eng
Subject C1
Abstract Introduction Little research has examined recognized pregnancy losses in a general population. Data from an Australian cohort study provide an opportunity to quantify this aspect of fecundity at a population level. Method Participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health who were aged 28–33 years in 2006 (n = 9,145) completed up to 4 mailed surveys over 10 years. Participants were categorized according to the recognized outcome of their pregnancies, including live birth, miscarriage/stillbirth, termination/ectopic, or no pregnancy. Results At age 18–23, more women reported terminations (7%) than miscarriages (4%). By 28–33 years, the cumulative frequency of miscarriage (15%) was as common as termination (16%). For women aged 28–33 years who had ever been pregnant (n = 5,343), pregnancy outcomes were as follows: birth only (50%); loss only (18%); and birth and loss (32%), of which half (16%) were birth and miscarriage. A comparison between first miscarriage and first birth (no miscarriage) showed that most first miscarriages occurred in women aged 18–23 years who also reported a first birth at the same survey (15%). Half (51%) of all first births and first miscarriages in women aged 18–19 ended in miscarriage. Early childbearers (<28 years) often had miscarriages around the same time period as their first live birth, suggesting proactive family formation. Delayed childbearers (32–33 years) had more first births than first miscarriages. Conclusion Recognized pregnancy losses are an important measure of fecundity in the general population because they indicate successful conception and maintenance of pregnancy to varying reproductive endpoints.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Women's Studies
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Women's Studies
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SSCI
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 13 Jun 2009, 04:14:28 EST by Siona Saplos on behalf of Office of Sponsored Research