Bias and regulation of bias in intergroup interactions: Implicit attitudes toward Muslims and interaction quality

Gonsalkorale, Karen, von Hippel, William, Shermanc, Jeffrey W. and Christoph Klauer, Karl (2009) Bias and regulation of bias in intergroup interactions: Implicit attitudes toward Muslims and interaction quality. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45 1: 161-166. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2008.07.022


Author Gonsalkorale, Karen
von Hippel, William
Shermanc, Jeffrey W.
Christoph Klauer, Karl
Title Bias and regulation of bias in intergroup interactions: Implicit attitudes toward Muslims and interaction quality
Journal name Journal of Experimental Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-1031
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jesp.2008.07.022
Open Access Status
Volume 45
Issue 1
Start page 161
End page 166
Total pages 6
Place of publication United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject C1
170113 Social and Community Psychology
Abstract Previous research suggests that automatically activated bias manifests itself in behavior that can jeopardize the quality of intergroup interactions. However, regulation of automatic associations has the potential to attenuate their influence on intergroup interaction. To test this possibility, 46 non-Muslim White participants interacted with a Muslim confederate and completed an implicit measure of attitudes toward Muslims. The Quadruple Process model [Sherman, J. W., Gawronski, B., Gonsalkorale, K., Hugenberg, K., Allen, T. J., & Groom, C. J. (2008). The self-regulation of automatic associations and behavioral impulses. Psychological Review, 115, 314–335] was applied to the implicit measure to estimate participants’ strength of negative associations with Muslims and their ability to overcome those negative associations. The confederate’s ratings of how much he liked the participants were predicted by an interaction between automatic negative associations and the ability to overcome them. Specifically, when the strength of participants’ negative associations with Muslims was low, participants’ level of overcoming bias was unrelated to the confederate’s ratings. In contrast, the ability to regulate automatic negative associations predicted greater liking when those associations were strong.
Keyword Intergroup interaction
Implicit attitudes
Automatic associations
Self-regulation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 11 Jun 2009, 03:28:24 EST by Siona Saplos on behalf of Office of Sponsored Research