Intradermal ballistic delivery of micro-particles into excised human skin for pharmaceutical applications

Kendall, Mark, Mitchell, Thomas and Wrighton-Smith, Peter (2004) Intradermal ballistic delivery of micro-particles into excised human skin for pharmaceutical applications. Journal of Biomechanics, 37 11: 1733-1741. doi:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2004.01.032


Author Kendall, Mark
Mitchell, Thomas
Wrighton-Smith, Peter
Title Intradermal ballistic delivery of micro-particles into excised human skin for pharmaceutical applications
Journal name Journal of Biomechanics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9290
1873-2380
Publication date 2004-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2004.01.032
Open Access Status
Volume 37
Issue 11
Start page 1733
End page 1741
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Subject 090301 Biomaterials
110799 Immunology not elsewhere classified
Abstract A unique form of needle-free drug and vaccine delivery is under investigation. The principle of the concept is to accelerate pharmaceuticals in particle form to a momentum sufficient to penetrate the outer layer of the human skin for a pharmacological effect. The relationship between the key particle impact parameters and particle penetration depth in excised human skin has been experimentally determined. Research devices have been used to deliver particles of a range of radii (0.89–53 μm), and density (1.08–18.2 g/cm3) at controlled and incremental impact velocities between 160 and 640 m/s. Analysis of the particle impact data reveals particle penetration depth as a function of particle density, radius and impact velocity. The experimental relationship provides a criterion for the optimal selection of particle parameters and velocity to target specific layers within the skin. Furthermore, some sources of variability in penetration depth have also been established. The experimental data have also been compared with a mechanistic Unified Penetration Model with good agreement.
Keyword Biolistics
Drug delivery
Gene gun
Skin
Vaccine
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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