Using Collaborative learning to develop transferable skills

Clarke, B., Pearce, M and Gannaway, D (2004). Using Collaborative learning to develop transferable skills. In: Transforming Knowledge into Wisdom: Holistic Approaches to Teaching and Learning. 27th Annual Conference Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) International Conference, Miri, Malaysia, (). 4- 7 July 2004.


Author Clarke, B.
Pearce, M
Gannaway, D
Title of paper Using Collaborative learning to develop transferable skills
Conference name 27th Annual Conference Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) International Conference
Conference location Miri, Malaysia
Conference dates 4- 7 July 2004
Proceedings title Transforming Knowledge into Wisdom: Holistic Approaches to Teaching and Learning
Publication Year 2004
Year available 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A multi-dimensional, team-based assignment was given to a class of 68 Environmental Systems students at Flinders University, South Australia. A collaborative learning approach was designed to facilitate the students’ development of transferable skills appropriate for potential future employment in the environmental management sector. At the outset a number of students verbalised their dislike for group work. On completion of the assignment, a review process found that 90% of the class felt that they had performed ‘well’ or ‘very well’, and reflected that they had learnt new skills from peers or had a deeper understanding of teamwork processes. Students predominately viewed their experience in a positive way with comments such as ‘we had fun and got along well’. The success of this cooperative learning exercise can be attributed to a number of factors. First, the assignment was multi-dimensional, the successful completion of which required a range of research,communication, practical, computer, and creative skills (i.e. the task was more suited to group work than individual work); secondly, in the embryonic stage of the assignment a framework was established that assisted with the identification of individuals’ strengths and interests; and finally, the use of a group ‘charter’ served to assist goal setting for the assignment
Subjects 330000 Education
339999 Other Education
Keyword collaborative learning
transferable skills
skill diversity
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Q-Index Code EX

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 28 May 2009, 12:01:52 EST by Deanne Gannaway on behalf of Teaching & Educational Development Institute