Economic evaluation of interventions for illicit opioid dependence: a review of evidence

Doran, Christopher M. (2008). Economic evaluation of interventions for illicit opioid dependence: a review of evidence. In: Pharmacoeconomics :. Third Meeting of Techincal Development Group (TDG) forThe Who "Guidelines for Psychosocially Assisted Pharmacotherapy of Opioid Deprndence", Geneva, Switzerland, (371-393). 17-21 September, 2007. doi:10.2165/00019053-200826050-00003


Author Doran, Christopher M.
Title of paper Economic evaluation of interventions for illicit opioid dependence: a review of evidence
Conference name Third Meeting of Techincal Development Group (TDG) forThe Who "Guidelines for Psychosocially Assisted Pharmacotherapy of Opioid Deprndence"
Conference location Geneva, Switzerland
Conference dates 17-21 September, 2007
Proceedings title Pharmacoeconomics :   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Pharmacoeconomics   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Auckland, NZ
Publisher Adis International
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.2165/00019053-200826050-00003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISSN 1170-7690
Volume 26
Issue 5
Start page 371
End page 393
Total pages 23
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Opiate dependence imposes a significant economic burden on society in terms of treatment-related costs and prevention services, other healthcare costs, the work absenteeism of patients, productivity loss arising from premature death of patients, costs associated with crime, and social welfare expenditure. The objective of this research is to review the literature on economic evaluation of treatment of opiate dependence (including detoxification, maintenance and psychosocial support). A literature review was performed on several electronic databases, including MEDLINE (Ovid), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, NHS Economic Evaluation Library Database (via Cochrane Library), Web of Science, Social Science Citations Index, EMBASE and PsycINFO. A sensitive approach was used in order to maximize the number of articles retrieved; no language or publication year limitations were applied to the searches. A combination of subject heading term searches and natural word searches were used. The Drummond checklist was applied to assess the quality of economic evaluations. A total of 259 articles were considered relevant, with eight review studies identified. The treatment spectrum ranged from detoxification to maintenance treatments involving the use of agonist and/or antagonist treatments. The evidence suggests that, although the quality of economic evaluations is reasonably good, there is a dearth of knowledge about the cost effectiveness of treatments for opiate dependence. The majority of the literature reporting the results of cost-effectiveness analyses used surrogate outcome measures and adopted a narrow treatment provider perspective. Studies that have conducted cost-benefit analyses, in spite of methodological divergences, generally adopted a societal perspective and consistently demonstrated positive economic returns from opiate treatment. A paucity of research examined the extent to which psychosocial or behavioural interventions support or replace conventional pharmacological approaches. Economic evaluation provides a useful framework to assist policy makers in allocating resources across competing needs. Opiate dependence is a considerable burden on society's resources, and treatment provides a cost-beneficial solution to address these consequences. However, to better inform the decision-making process, researchers must continue to produce high-quality, methodological, comparable and scientifically credible economic evaluations.
Subjects 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Sub-type: Fully published paper
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 27 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 19 May 2009, 00:08:02 EST by Ms Lynette Adams on behalf of School of Public Health