Motivation for weight-loss diets: A clustering, longitudinal field study using self-esteem and self-determination theory perspectives

Georgiadis, Manolis M., Biddle, Stuart J. H. and Stavrou, Nektarios A. (2006) Motivation for weight-loss diets: A clustering, longitudinal field study using self-esteem and self-determination theory perspectives. Health Education Journal, 65 1: 53-72. doi:10.1177/0017896906066067


Author Georgiadis, Manolis M.
Biddle, Stuart J. H.
Stavrou, Nektarios A.
Title Motivation for weight-loss diets: A clustering, longitudinal field study using self-esteem and self-determination theory perspectives
Journal name Health Education Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0017-8969
1748-8176
Publication date 2006-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0017896906066067
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 65
Issue 1
Start page 53
End page 72
Total pages 20
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Subject 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology
Abstract Background Gradual elevation of body weight leads numerous individuals to dieting and weight loss behaviours. Nevertheless, the prevalence of obesity continues to rise in industrialised countries. The examination of the motivational determinants of dietary modification (‘dieting’) in order to identify clusters of individuals in the first 6 months of their effort to control body weight was the aim of the current study. The theories of self-determination and self-esteem formation guided our analysis. Methods A longitudinal study was conducted with three data collection points (N1=256; N2=135; N3=75). Data were responses on the Treatment Self Regulation Questionnaire, Social Physique Anxiety Scale, Physical Self-Description Questionnaire, Kaiser Physical Activity Survey Questionnaire, and items assessing expectations of achievement and self-confidence. Results Cluster analyses provided stable and validated cluster profiles for all data sets. In the 1st and 2nd data sets, results revealed three groups of dieters labelled as ‘media victims’, ‘try to feel nice’ and ‘older and experienced’. For the 3rd data set, results supported a 4-group solution (‘less adaptive profile’, ‘second successful dieters’, ‘successful dieters’, and ‘unsuccessful dieters’). The need for autonomous versus controlling dieting reasons based on Self-Determination Theory, along with the need for an alternative paradigm in weight management, are proposed. Conclusions Psychological theories of self-determination and self-esteem provide important ways of understanding and identifying adaptive and less adaptive weight control strategies.
Keyword motivation
self-determination
cluster analysis
self-esteem
physical activity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 12 May 2009, 19:20:42 EST by Sophie Jordan on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences