Structural development of the basal ganglia in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A diffusion tensor imaging study

Silk, Timothy J., Vance, Alasdair, Rinehart, Nicole, Bradshaw, John L and Cunnington, Ross (2009) Structural development of the basal ganglia in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A diffusion tensor imaging study. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 172 3: 220-225. doi:10.1016/j.pscychresns.2008.07.003


Author Silk, Timothy J.
Vance, Alasdair
Rinehart, Nicole
Bradshaw, John L
Cunnington, Ross
Title Structural development of the basal ganglia in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: A diffusion tensor imaging study
Journal name Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0925-4927
1872-7506
Publication date 2009-04-24
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2008.07.003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 172
Issue 3
Start page 220
End page 225
Total pages 6
Editor Buchsbaum, Monte S.
Place of publication Shannon, Co. Clare Ireland
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract One of the most consistently reported brain regions of structural and functional difference in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the basal ganglia, particularly the caudate nucleus. Examining the structural organization of the basal ganglia in ADHD is important because it is the center of wider fronto-striatal networks, reported to be dysfunctional in ADHD. Fifteen right-handed 8- to 18-year-old males with ADHD-combined type and 15 right-handed, age- and performance IQ-matched healthy males underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Caudate, putamen and thalamus were manually identified as regions of interest (ROIs) and tested for differences in fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. Measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) showed the expected increase with age within the whole-brain volume and within putamen and thalamus ROIs for both ADHD and control groups. In the caudate nucleus, however, developmental changes in FA with age were significantly different between ADHD and control groups. This study shows that the developmental trajectory of micro-structural organization within the caudate nucleus is different in children with ADHD compared with controls over ages 8-18 years. We suggest that the difference in developmental trajectories arises predominantly during mid-late adolescence and may reflect a developmental delay that begins to normalise over this critical late adolescent age. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
One of the most consistently reported brain regions of structural and functional difference in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the basal ganglia, particularly the caudate nucleus. Examining the structural organization of the basal ganglia in ADHD is important because it is the center of wider fronto-striatal networks, reported to be dysfunctional in ADHD. Fifteen right-handed 8- to 18-year-old males with ADHD-combined type and 15 right-handed, age- and performance IQ-matched healthy males underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Caudate, putamen and thalamus were manually identified as regions of interest (ROIs) and tested for differences in fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity. Measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) showed the expected increase with age within the whole-brain volume and within putamen and thalamus ROIs for both ADHD and control groups. In the caudate nucleus, however, developmental changes in FA with age were significantly different between ADHD and control groups. This study shows that the developmental trajectory of micro-structural organization within the caudate nucleus is different in children with ADHD compared with controls over ages 8–18 years. We suggest that the difference in developmental trajectories arises predominantly during mid-late adolescence and may reflect a developmental delay that begins to normalise over this critical late adolescent age.
Keyword Clinical Neurology
Neuroimaging
Psychiatry
Neurosciences & Neurology
Psychiatry
CLINICAL NEUROLOGY
NEUROIMAGING
PSYCHIATRY, SCI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 384419
217025
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 38 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 09 May 2009, 02:03:35 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute