Exploring the Influence of Psychological Factors on Breastfeeding Duration, Phase 1: Perceptions of Mothers and Clinicians

O'Brien, Maxine, Buikstra, Elizabeth, Fallon, Tony and Hegney, Desley (2009) Exploring the Influence of Psychological Factors on Breastfeeding Duration, Phase 1: Perceptions of Mothers and Clinicians. Journal of Human Lactation, 25 1: 55-63. doi:10.1177/0890334408326071


Author O'Brien, Maxine
Buikstra, Elizabeth
Fallon, Tony
Hegney, Desley
Title Exploring the Influence of Psychological Factors on Breastfeeding Duration, Phase 1: Perceptions of Mothers and Clinicians
Journal name Journal of Human Lactation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0890-3344
Publication date 2009-02-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0890334408326071
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 55
End page 63
Total pages 9
Editor M Jane Heinig
Place of publication United States
Publisher Sage Science Press (US)
Language eng
Subject C1
321101 Midwifery
920501 Child Health
111714 Mental Health
111704 Community Child Health
Abstract Breastfeeding duration rates in Australia are low, prompting a search for modifiable factors capable of increasing the duration of breastfeeding. In this study, participants were asked which psychological factors they believed influence breastfeeding duration. Participants included 3 groups of mothers who had breastfed for varied lengths of time (n = 17), and 1 group of breastfeeding clinicians (n = 4). The nominal group technique was employed, involving a structured group meeting progressing through several steps. Analyses included collation of individual and group responses, group comparisons, and a thematic analysis of group discussions. Forty-five psychological factors thought to influence the duration of breastfeeding were identified. Factors considered most important included the mother's priorities and mothering self-efficacy, faith in breast milk, adaptability, stress, and breastfeeding self-efficacy. In addition to informing the design of phase 2 of this study, these results add to our knowledge of this emerging research area.
Formatted abstract
Breastfeeding duration rates in Australia are low, prompting a search for modifiable factors capable of increasing the duration of breastfeeding. In this study, participants were asked which psychological factors they believed influence breastfeeding duration. Participants included 3 groups of mothers who had breastfed for varied lengths of time (n = 17), and 1 group of breastfeeding clinicians (n = 4). The nominal group technique was employed,
involving a structured group meeting progressing through several steps. Analyses included collation of individual and group responses, group comparisons, and a thematic analysis of group discussions. Forty-five psychological factors thought to influence the duration of breastfeeding were identified. Factors considered most important included the mother’s
priorities and mothering self-efficacy, faith in breast milk, adaptability, stress, and breastfeeding self-efficacy. In addition to informing the design of phase 2 of this study, these results add to our knowledge of this emerging research area.
Keyword breastfeeding
breastfeeding duration
psychological factors
mental health
transition to motherhood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 29 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 05 May 2009, 22:02:22 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work