Measuring the symptom experience of Chinese cancer patients: A validation of the Chinese version of the memorial symptom assessment scale

Cheng, Karis K. F., Wong, Eric M. C., Ling, W. M., Chan, Carmen W. H. and Thompson, David R. (2009) Measuring the symptom experience of Chinese cancer patients: A validation of the Chinese version of the memorial symptom assessment scale. Journal of Pain And Symptom Management, 37 1: 44-57. doi:10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2007.12.019


Author Cheng, Karis K. F.
Wong, Eric M. C.
Ling, W. M.
Chan, Carmen W. H.
Thompson, David R.
Title Measuring the symptom experience of Chinese cancer patients: A validation of the Chinese version of the memorial symptom assessment scale
Journal name Journal of Pain And Symptom Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0885-3924
1873-6513
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2007.12.019
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 1
Start page 44
End page 57
Total pages 13
Editor Russell K. Portenoy
Place of publication New York, N.Y., U.S.A.
Publisher Elsevier Science
Language eng
Subject 320206 Tumor Immunology
920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
C1
Abstract The purpose of this study was to translate the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS) into Chinese and evaluate the psychometric properties of this version. The original MSAS is a 32-item, patient-rated measure that was developed to assess common cancer-related physical and psychological symptoms with respect to frequency, intensity, and distress. In this study, a two-phase design was used. Phase I involved iterative forward–backward translation, testing of content validity (CVI) and a pretest. Phase II established the psychometric properties of the Chinese version MSAS (MSAS-Ch). Results showed that the MSAS-Ch achieved content relevancy CVI of 0.94 and semantic equivalence CVI of 0.94. Pretesting was performed in 10 cancer patients, and the results revealed adequate content coverage and comprehensibility of the MSAS-Ch. A convenience sample of 370 patients undergoing cancer therapy or at the early post-treatment stage was recruited for psychometric evaluation. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the construct validity of the MSAS-Ch, with a good fit between the factor structure of the original version and our present sample data (goodness-of-fit indices all above 0.95). The internal consistency reliability of subscales and total MSAS-Ch was moderately high, with Cronbach alpha coefficients ranging from 0.79 to 0.87. The test–retest intraclass correlation results for the subscale and total MSAS-Ch ranged from 0.68 to 0.79. The subscale scores of MSAS-Ch were moderately correlated with the scores on various validation measurements that assessed psychological distress, pain, and health-related quality of life (r = 0.46–0.65, P < 0.01), confirming that they were measurements of similar constructs. The validity of the construct validity was also supported by comparing the MSAS-Ch scores for subpopulations that varied clinically. Inpatients and patients with poorer performance status scored higher on the MSAS-Ch subscale and total scores than outpatients and patients with higher performance status (P < 0.05). Our study shows that the MSAS-Ch has adequate psychometric properties of validity and reliability, and can be used to assess symptoms during cancer therapy and at the early post-treatment stage in Chinese-speaking patients.
Keyword symptoms
cancer
MSAS
validation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 05 May 2009, 19:54:27 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work