Phlogenetic Analysis informed by Geological History supports Multiple, Sequential Invasions of the Mediterranean Basin by the Angiosperm Family Araceae

Mansion, G., Rosenbaum, Gideon, Schoenenberger, N., Bacchetta, G., Rossello, J.A. and Conti, E. (2008) Phlogenetic Analysis informed by Geological History supports Multiple, Sequential Invasions of the Mediterranean Basin by the Angiosperm Family Araceae. Systematic Biology, 57 2: 269-285. doi:10.1080/10635150802044029


Author Mansion, G.
Rosenbaum, Gideon
Schoenenberger, N.
Bacchetta, G.
Rossello, J.A.
Conti, E.
Title Phlogenetic Analysis informed by Geological History supports Multiple, Sequential Invasions of the Mediterranean Basin by the Angiosperm Family Araceae
Journal name Systematic Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1076-836X
1063-5157
Publication date 2008-04-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1080/10635150802044029
Open Access Status
Volume 57
Issue 2
Start page 269
End page 285
Total pages 17
Place of publication London
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Subject C1
970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
040303 Geochronology
Abstract Despite the remarkable species richness of the Mediterranean flora and its well-known geological history, few studies have investigated its temporal and spatial origins. Most importantly, the relative contribution of geological processes and long-distance dispersal to the composition of contemporary Mediterranean biotas remains largely unknown. We used phylogenetic analyses of sequences from six chloroplast DNA markers, Bayesian dating methods, and ancestral area reconstructions, in combination with paleogeographic, paleoclimatic, and ecological evidence, to elucidate the time frame and biogeographic events associated with the diversification of Araceae in the Mediterranean Basin. We focused on the origin of four species, Ambrosina bassii, Biarum dispar, Helicodiceros muscivorus, Arum pictum, subendemic or endemic to Corsica, Sardinia, and the Balearic Archipelago. The results support two main invasions of the Mediterranean Basin by the Araceae, one from an area connecting North America and Eurasia in the Late Cretaceous and one from the Anatolian microplate in western Asia during the Late Eocene, thus confirming the proposed heterogeneous origins of the Mediterranean flora. The subendemic Ambrosina bassii and Biarum dispar likely diverged sympatrically from their widespread Mediterranean sister clades in the Early-Middle Eocene and Early-Middle Miocene, respectively. Combined evidence corroborates a relictual origin for the endemic Helicodiceros muscivorus and Arum pictum, the former apparently representing the first documented case of vicariance driven by the initial splitting of the Hercynian belt in the Early Oligocene. A recurrent theme emerging from our analyses is that land connections and interruptions, caused by repeated cycles of marine transgressions-regressions between the Tethys and Paratethys, favored geodispersalist expansion of biotic ranges from western Asia into the western Mediterranean Basin and subsequent allopatric speciation at different points in time from the Late Eocene to the Late Oligocene.
Keyword Araceae
Biogeography
DIVA
endemism
fossil calibration
Mediterranean Basin
Molecular Dating
paleomap
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Earth Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 87 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 91 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 20 Apr 2009, 08:45:12 EST by Ms Christine Sinclair on behalf of School of Earth Sciences