Short-term responses of leaf growth rate to water deficit scale up to whole-plant and crop levels: an integrated modelling approach in maize

Chenu, Karine, Chapman, Scott C., Hammer, Graeme L., McLean, Gregg, Salah, Halim Ben Haj, Tardieu, Francois and Mott, Keith (2008) Short-term responses of leaf growth rate to water deficit scale up to whole-plant and crop levels: an integrated modelling approach in maize. Plant, Cell and Environment, 31 3: 378-391. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3040.2007.01772.x


Author Chenu, Karine
Chapman, Scott C.
Hammer, Graeme L.
McLean, Gregg
Salah, Halim Ben Haj
Tardieu, Francois
Mott, Keith
Title Short-term responses of leaf growth rate to water deficit scale up to whole-plant and crop levels: an integrated modelling approach in maize
Journal name Plant, Cell and Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0140-7791
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3040.2007.01772.x
Open Access Status
Volume 31
Issue 3
Start page 378
End page 391
Total pages 14
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Language eng
Subject C1
820401 Maize
070303 Crop and Pasture Biochemistry and Physiology
Abstract Physiological and genetic studies of leaf growth often focus on short-term responses, leaving a gap to whole-plant models that predict biomass accumulation, transpiration and yield at crop scale. To bridge this gap, we developed a model that combines an existing model of leaf 6 expansion in response to short-term environmental variations with a model coordinating the development of all leaves of a plant. The latter was based on: (1) rates of leaf initiation, appearance and end of elongation measured in field experiments; and (2) the hypothesis of an independence of the growth between leaves. The resulting whole-plant leaf model was integrated into the generic crop model APSIM which provided dynamic feedback of environmental conditions to the leaf model and allowed simulation of crop growth at canopy level. The model was tested in 12 field situations with contrasting temperature, evaporative demand and soil water status. In observed and simulated data, high evaporative demand reduced leaf area at the whole-plant level, and short water deficits affected only leaves developing during the stress, either visible or still hidden in the whorl. The model adequately simulated whole-plant profiles of leaf area with a single set of parameters that applied to the same hybrid in all experiments. It was also suitable to predict biomass accumulation and yield of a similar hybrid grown in different conditions. This model extends to field conditions existing knowledge of the environmental controls of leaf elongation, and can be used to simulate how their genetic controls flow through to yield.
Keyword Plant Sciences
Plant Sciences
PLANT SCIENCES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Mon, 20 Apr 2009, 01:15:49 EST by Emma Cushworth on behalf of School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences