Rich media technologies and uncertain futures: Developing sustainable, scalable models

Andrews, Patricia, Smyth, Robyn, Tynan, Belinda, Vale, Deb and Caladine, Richard (2008). Rich media technologies and uncertain futures: Developing sustainable, scalable models. In: Roger Atkinson and Clare McBeath, Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology? Proceedings ascilite Melbourne 2008. ascilite 2008: Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology?, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, (36-40). 30 November - 3 December 2008.


Author Andrews, Patricia
Smyth, Robyn
Tynan, Belinda
Vale, Deb
Caladine, Richard
Title of paper Rich media technologies and uncertain futures: Developing sustainable, scalable models
Conference name ascilite 2008: Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology?
Conference location Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Conference dates 30 November - 3 December 2008
Convener Prof Alan Farley and Dr Dale Holt
Proceedings title Hello! Where are you in the landscape of educational technology? Proceedings ascilite Melbourne 2008
Journal name ASCILITE 2008 - The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Series ASCILITE 2008 - The Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education
Place of Publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Deakin University
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9780980592719
Editor Roger Atkinson
Clare McBeath
Start page 36
End page 40
Total pages 5
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Rich media technologies are commonly defined as technologies that enable users to engage in interactive communication, with the ability to see, hear and interact with multiple communication streams synchronously or access them asynchronously. Rich media technologies are also characterised by their ability to support non-verbal communication such as body language and vocal inflection. The rapidly increasing access to rich media technologies such as video and web conferencing both commercially available and as open source, provides a wealth of opportunities for education. This is a rapidly changing landscape as existing and emerging technologies increase both access and expectation in regards to communication. Coupled with this is the growing recognition that new generations of students have greater expectations of media rich learning opportunities and in many cases institutions are poorly placed to respond to this demand.
Subjects E1
930203 Teaching and Instruction Technologies
130103 Higher Education
1301 Education Systems
Keyword Rich media technology
Videoconferencing
Non-verbal communication
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Sub-type: Fully published paper
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 18 Apr 2009, 02:19:05 EST by Ms Kathleen Mcleod on behalf of Teaching & Educational Development Institute