A review of first aid treatments for burn injuries

Cuttle, Leila, Pearn, John, McMillan, James R. and Kimble, Roy M. (2009) A review of first aid treatments for burn injuries. Burns, 35 6: 768-775. doi:10.1016/j.burns.2008.10.011


Author Cuttle, Leila
Pearn, John
McMillan, James R.
Kimble, Roy M.
Title A review of first aid treatments for burn injuries
Formatted title
A review of first aid treatments for burn injuries
Journal name Burns   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-4179
Publication date 2009-09-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.burns.2008.10.011
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 35
Issue 6
Start page 768
End page 775
Total pages 8
Editor S Wolf
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 320503 Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
C1
920117 Skin and Related Disorders
1103 Clinical Sciences
1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Abstract Throughout history there have been many different and sometimes bizarre treatments prescribed for burns. Unfortunately many of these treatments still persist today, although they often do not have sufficient evidence to support their use. This paper reviews common first aid and pre-hospital treatments for burns (water—cold or warm, ice, oils, powders and natural plant therapies), possible mechanisms whereby they might work and the literature which supports their use. From the published work to date, the current recommendations for the first aid treatment of burn injuries should be to use cold running tap water (between 2 and 15 °C) on the burn, not ice or alternative plant therapies.
Formatted abstract
Abstract
Throughout history there have been many different and sometimes bizarre treatments prescribed for burns. Unfortunately many of these treatments still persist today, although they often do not have sufficient evidence to support their use. This paper reviews common first aid and pre-hospital treatments for burns (water—cold or warm, ice, oils, powders and natural plant therapies), possible mechanisms whereby they might work and the literature which supports their use. From the published work to date, the current recommendations for the first aid treatment of burn injuries should be to use cold running tap water (between 2 and 15 °C) on the burn, not ice or alternative plant therapies.

Keyword First aid
Water - cold
Water - warm
Ice
Plant therapies
Oils
Folk remedies
Burn management
Wound management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 18 Apr 2009, 01:28:55 EST by Belinda Wallis on behalf of Paediatrics & Child Health - RBWH