Optimization of the microencapsulation of lemon myrtle oil using response surface methodology

Huynh, The Vien, Caffin, Nola A., Dykes, Gary A. and Bhandari, Bhesh R. (2008) Optimization of the microencapsulation of lemon myrtle oil using response surface methodology. Drying Technology, 26 3: 357-368. doi:10.1080/07373930801898182


Author Huynh, The Vien
Caffin, Nola A.
Dykes, Gary A.
Bhandari, Bhesh R.
Title Optimization of the microencapsulation of lemon myrtle oil using response surface methodology
Journal name Drying Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0737-3937
1532-2300
Publication date 2008-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/07373930801898182
Open Access Status
Volume 26
Issue 3
Start page 357
End page 368
Total pages 12
Editor Arun S. Mujumdar
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Language eng
Subject C1
860199 Processed Food Products and Beverages (excl. Dairy Products) not elsewhere classified
090802 Food Engineering
Abstract Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to study the effects of types of wall materials (modified starch + maltodextrin and whey protein concentrate + maltodextrin), feed concentration, oil concentration, and outlet air temperature on oil retention and surface oil content of the encapsulated powder. The results revealed that the oil retention was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the constant term of types of wall materials and the linear term of feed concentration but seemed to be almost independent (P > 0.05) of experimental range of oil concentration and outlet air temperature. The types of wall materials, oil load, and outlet air temperature showed a significant (P < 0.05) influence on surface oil content. The types of wall materials (Hi-Cap and WPC) also influenced significantly the oil retention and surface oil content. Based on the limited range of experimental conditions used in this work, it was not possible to choose the wall materials that can give both high oil retention and low surface oil content. Disregarding the effect of wall material, an optimum response was obtained at 40% of feed concentration (w/w), 18% of oil concentration, and 65°C of outlet air temperature.
Formatted abstract
Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to study the effects of types of wall materials (modified starch + maltodextrin and whey protein concentrate + maltodextrin), feed concentration, oil concentration, and outlet air temperature on oil retention and surface oil content of the encapsulated powder. The results revealed that the oil retention was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the constant term of types of wall materials and the linear term of feed concentration but seemed to be almost independent (P > 0.05) of experimental range of oil concentration and outlet air temperature. The types of wall materials, oil load, and outlet air temperature showed a significant (P < 0.05) influence on surface oil content. The types of wall materials (Hi-Cap and WPC) also influenced significantly the oil retention and surface oil content. Based on the limited range of experimental conditions used in this work, it was not possible to choose the wall materials that can give both high oil retention and low surface oil content. Disregarding the effect of wall material, an optimum response was obtained at 40% of feed concentration (w/w), 18% of oil concentration, and 65°C of outlet air temperature.
Copyright © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
Keyword Hi-Cap
Lemon myrtle oil (LMO)
Microfluidization
Response surface methodology (RSM)
Spray drying
Whey protein concentrate (WPC)
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Fri, 17 Apr 2009, 22:16:19 EST by Emma Cushworth on behalf of School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences