Application of Population Viability Analysis to Landscape Conservation Planning

Beissinger, S., Nicholson, E. and Possingham, H.P. (2008). Application of Population Viability Analysis to Landscape Conservation Planning. In Millspaugh, J. and Thompson, F. (Ed.), Models for Planning Wildlife Conservation in Large Landscapes (pp. 33-49) United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-373631-4.00002-2


Author Beissinger, S.
Nicholson, E.
Possingham, H.P.
Title of chapter Application of Population Viability Analysis to Landscape Conservation Planning
Title of book Models for Planning Wildlife Conservation in Large Landscapes
Place of Publication United Kingdom
Publisher Academic Press
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1016/B978-0-12-373631-4.00002-2
Open Access Status
ISBN 978-0-12-373631-4
Editor Millspaugh, J.
Thompson, F.
Start page 33
End page 49
Total pages 17
Total chapters 24
Language eng
Subjects B1
960599 Ecosystem Assessment and Management not elsewhere classified
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
Abstract/Summary Large-scale landscape planning to maintain biodiversity usually integrates coarse-scale assessments of land use change with systematic evaluations of its effects on the likelihood of species becoming extinct years in the future, or their population viability. There are many methods for modeling population viability. They include demographic models that assess the impact of management on the rate of population growth or risk of extinction, analyses of occupancy using presence-absence data, population trend analysis, and genetic models that assess the loss of genetic diversity. Demographic models explicitly incorporate birth and death rates, and to varying degrees the processes that affect them, and are often used to evaluate population viability. Demographic models vary in complexity from deterministic matrix models of a single population to stochastic, spatially explicit individual-based models that keep track of each individual on specific landscapes. The population viability analysis tools are used to provide information that can, in turn, be used in either systematic conservation planning or to design landscapes. The examples of such use include setting minimum population or patch sizes for single species or multispecies systematic conservation planning, and parameterizing statistical approximation models.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 17 Apr 2009, 20:58:01 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences