Practitioners' documentation of assessment and care planning in social care: The opportunities for organizational learning

Foster, Michele, Harris, Jennifer, Jackson, Karen and Glendinning, Caroline (2008) Practitioners' documentation of assessment and care planning in social care: The opportunities for organizational learning. British Journal of Social Work, 38 3: 546-560. doi:10.1093/bjsw/bcl366

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Author Foster, Michele
Harris, Jennifer
Jackson, Karen
Glendinning, Caroline
Title Practitioners' documentation of assessment and care planning in social care: The opportunities for organizational learning
Journal name British Journal of Social Work   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1468-263X
0045-3102
Publication date 2008-04-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/bjsw/bcl366
Open Access Status
Volume 38
Issue 3
Start page 546
End page 560
Total pages 15
Editor Eric Blyth
Helen Masson
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Subject 920208 Health Policy Evaluation
160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified
CX
1607 Social Work
160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Services
160703 Social Program Evaluation
Abstract This paper analyses practitioners’ documentation of social care assessments and care plans for disabled adults of working age. The data were collected in the course of an innovative project that introduced new outcome-focused documentation into routine social care assessment, care management and review processes. The project aimed to encourage practitioners to focus during these processes on the full range of outcomes that individual disabled adults might seek to achieve; and identify the appropriate services for realizing those outcomes. Analysis of the new documentation provides insights into the diverse range of priorities and outcomes that service users aspire to achieve as a result of receiving services, and the service inputs that were agreed between practitioners and service users. However, despite the new documentation, the majority of both outcomes and services that were recorded tended to cluster around a fairly narrow range of conventional social care service functions. Moreover, the emphasis of both outcomes and service inputs differed between different groups of social care professionals. In the context of current policies to make social care services more individualized and outcomefocused, each of these findings has major organizational implications. The opportunities for using routine practitioner documentation to identify areas of organizational and professional change and learning are discussed.
Keyword Social care
Outcome-focused services
Disabled adults
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 17 Apr 2009, 09:11:58 EST by Elena Stewart on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences