Biogeochemical responses following coral mass spawning on the Great Barrier Reef: pelagic-benthic coupling

Wild, C., Jantzen, C., Struck, U., Hoegh-Guldberg, O. and Huettel, M. (2008) Biogeochemical responses following coral mass spawning on the Great Barrier Reef: pelagic-benthic coupling. Coral Reefs, 27 1: 123-132. doi:10.1007/s00338-007-0298-7


Author Wild, C.
Jantzen, C.
Struck, U.
Hoegh-Guldberg, O.
Huettel, M.
Title Biogeochemical responses following coral mass spawning on the Great Barrier Reef: pelagic-benthic coupling
Journal name Coral Reefs   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0722-4028
Publication date 2008-03-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00338-007-0298-7
Open Access Status
Volume 27
Issue 1
Start page 123
End page 132
Total pages 10
Editor Brown, B. E.
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
960808 Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
Abstract This study quantified how the pulse of organic matter from the release of coral gametes triggered a chain of pelagic and benthic processes during an annual mass spawning event on the Australian Great Barrier Reef. Particulate organic matter (POM) concentrations in reef waters increased by threefold to 11-fold the day after spawning and resulted in a stimulation of pelagic oxygen consumption rates that lasted for at least 1 week. Water column microbial communities degraded the organic carbon of gametes of the broadcast-spawning coral Acropora millepora at a rate of > 15% h(-1), which is about three times faster than the degradation rate measured for larvae of the brooding coral Stylophora pistillata. Stable isotope signatures of POM in the water column reflected the fast transfer of organic matter from coral gametes into higher levels of the food chain, and the amount of POM reaching the seafloor immediately increased after coral spawning and then tailed-off in the next 2 weeks. Short-lasting phytoplankton blooms developed within a few days after the spawning event, indicating a prompt recycling of nutrients released through the degradation of spawning products. These data show the profound effects of coral mass spawning on the reef community and demonstrate the tight recycling of nutrients in this oligotrophic ecosystem.
Keyword Marine & Freshwater Biology
Marine & Freshwater Biology
MARINE & FRESHWATER BIOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Centre for Marine Studies Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 34 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 17 Apr 2009, 01:36:08 EST by Peter Fogarty on behalf of Centre for Marine Studies