'I don't do the mothering role that lots of female teachers do': Male teachers, gender, power and social organisation

Haase, M. (2008) 'I don't do the mothering role that lots of female teachers do': Male teachers, gender, power and social organisation. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 29 6: 597-608. doi:10.1080/01425690802423270


Author Haase, M.
Title 'I don't do the mothering role that lots of female teachers do': Male teachers, gender, power and social organisation
Journal name British Journal of Sociology of Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0142-5692
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01425690802423270
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 6
Start page 597
End page 608
Total pages 12
Editor Barton, L.
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 13 Education
93 Education and Training
C1
Abstract The present article reports on a research project investigating the experiences of male primary teachers in Queensland, Australia. While its findings cannot be presented as indicative of all male teachers in all contexts, it does, however, send a warning to policy-makers that the employment of more male teachers may not be in the best interests of gender justice unless such strategies designed to attract more male teachers are informed by sophisticated understandings of gender and social power. Utilising a (pro) feminist post-structuralist theoretical perspective, it is demonstrated how some male teachers contribute to the maintenance of segregated work roles, which is of central importance to the continuance of gender power differentials in a patriarchal society. The research method focused on social relationships and involved a series of semi-structured/life history interviews with 11 male teachers, six female teachers, two male principals and two female principals. An important implication from this research is that the employment of male teachers must be accompanied by an awareness of how teacher practice impacts upon the socialisation of students and how such practice reinforces or contributes to change in the broader gender system.
Keyword Education
Gender
Male teachers
Power
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 25 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 23:39:26 EST by Rebecca Donohoe on behalf of School of Education