Attributions of Responsibility for Rape: Differences Across Familiarity of Situation, Gender and Acceptance of Rape Myths

Newcombe, Peter A., Van Den Eynde, Julie, Hafner, Diane and Jolly, Lesley (2008) Attributions of Responsibility for Rape: Differences Across Familiarity of Situation, Gender and Acceptance of Rape Myths. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 38 7: 1736-1754. doi:10.1111/j.1559-1816.2008.00367.x


Author Newcombe, Peter A.
Van Den Eynde, Julie
Hafner, Diane
Jolly, Lesley
Title Attributions of Responsibility for Rape: Differences Across Familiarity of Situation, Gender and Acceptance of Rape Myths
Journal name Journal of Applied Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9029
Publication date 2008-07-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1559-1816.2008.00367.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 38
Issue 7
Start page 1736
End page 1754
Total pages 19
Editor Baum, Andrew
Place of publication United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
Language eng
Subject C1
170113 Social and Community Psychology
970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract In 2004 in Australia, controversy over the alleged involvement of elite footballers in incidents of sexual assault highlighted a tendency to denigrate the victims and excuse the perpetrators. To investigate whether rape myths were prevalent enough to explain this public response, 102 university students were surveyed for their beliefs and determinations of blame in rape situations. Although there was a gender difference in the rates of rape myth acceptance, with males more likely to accept these beliefs, these were not evident in decisions about victim blame or perpetrator blame. However, males and high rape myth acceptors were significantly more likely to minimize the seriousness of the rape situation. These effects increased with familiarity depicted in the situation.
Keyword Attitudes
Perceptions
Victim
Women
Acquaintance
Prevention
Behavior
Program
Race
Mens
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 23:00:40 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology