Every family: a population approach to reducing behavioural and emotional problems in children making the transition to school

Sanders, Matthew R., Ralph, Alan, Sofronoff, Katherine V., Gardiner, Paul, Thompson, Rachel, Dwyer, Sarah and Bidwell, Kerry (2008) Every family: a population approach to reducing behavioural and emotional problems in children making the transition to school. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 29 3: 197-222. doi:10.1007/s10935-008-0139-7


Author Sanders, Matthew R.
Ralph, Alan
Sofronoff, Katherine V.
Gardiner, Paul
Thompson, Rachel
Dwyer, Sarah
Bidwell, Kerry
Title Every family: a population approach to reducing behavioural and emotional problems in children making the transition to school
Formatted title
Every family: a population approach to reducing behavioural and emotional problems in children making the transition to school
Journal name The Journal of Primary Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-095X
1573-6547
Publication date 2008-05-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10935-008-0139-7
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 3
Start page 197
End page 222
Total pages 26
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject 920209 Mental Health Services
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract A large-scale population trial using the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program (TPS) was evaluated. The target population was all parents of 4- to 7-year-old children residing in ten geographical catchment areas in Brisbane (intervention communities) and ten sociodemographically matched catchment areas from Sydney (5) and Melbourne (5), care as usual (CAU) comparison communities. All five levels of the Triple P multilevel system of intervention were employed; including a local mass media strategy, a primary care strategy, and three more intensive levels of parenting intervention delivered by a range of service providers (e.g., health, education, and welfare sectors). Program outcomes were assessed through a computer-assisted telephone interview of a random sample of households (N = 3000) in each community at pre-intervention and again at two years post-intervention. At post-intervention there were significantly greater reductions in the TPS communities in the number of children with clinically elevated and borderline behavioral and emotional problems compared to the CAU communities. Similarly parents reported a greater reduction in the prevalence of depression, stress and coercive parenting. Findings show the feasibility of targeting dysfunctional parenting practices in a cost-effective manner and the public acceptance of an approach that blends universal and targeted program elements. Editors’ Strategic Implications: This is the first positive parenting program to demonstrate longitudinal, population-level effects for parents and children. The authors provide an excellent example of multilevel prevention planning, coordination, execution, and evaluation.
Keyword Parenting
Prevention of behaviour problems
Dysfunctional parenting
Triple P
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 76 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 22:53:23 EST by Mrs Jennifer English on behalf of School of Psychology