Achieving the nitrite pathway using aeration phase length control and step-feed in an SBR removing nutrients from abattoir waste

Romain Lemaire, Marcelino, M. and Yuan, Zhiguo (2008) Achieving the nitrite pathway using aeration phase length control and step-feed in an SBR removing nutrients from abattoir waste. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 100 6: 1228-1236. doi:10.1002/bit.21844


Author Romain Lemaire
Marcelino, M.
Yuan, Zhiguo
Title Achieving the nitrite pathway using aeration phase length control and step-feed in an SBR removing nutrients from abattoir waste
Journal name Biotechnology and Bioengineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3592
Publication date 2008-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/bit.21844
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 100
Issue 6
Start page 1228
End page 1236
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York
Publisher Wiley Science
Language eng
Subject C1
969999 Environment not elsewhere classified
090409 Wastewater Treatment Processes
Abstract Aeration phase length control and step-feed of wastewater are used to achieve nitrogen removal from wastewater via nitrite in sequencing batch reactors (SBR). Aeration is switched off as soon as ammonia oxidation is completed, which is followed by the addition of a fraction of the wastewater that the SBR receives over a cycle to facilitate denitrification. The end-point of ammonia oxidation is detected from the on-line measured pH and oxygen uptake rate (OUR). The method was implemented in an SBR achieving biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal from anaerobically pre-treated abattoir wastewater. The degree of nitrite accumulation during the aeration period was monitored along with the variation in the nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) population using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. It is demonstrated that the nitrite pathway could be repeatedly and reliably achieved, which significantly reduced the carbon requirement for nutrient removal. Model-based studies show that the establishment of the nitrite pathway was primarily the result of a gradual reduction of the amount of nitrite that is available to provide energy for the growth of NOB, eventually leading to the elimination of NOB from the system.
Keyword Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
BIOTECHNOLOGY & APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Advanced Water Management Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 20:13:03 EST by Suzanne Read on behalf of Advanced Water Management Centre