Can technology and the media help reduce dysfunctional parenting and increase engagement with preventative parenting interventions?

Calam, Rachel, Sanders, Matthew R., Miller, Chloe, Sadhnani, Vaneeta and Carmont, Sue-Ann (2008) Can technology and the media help reduce dysfunctional parenting and increase engagement with preventative parenting interventions?. Child Maltreatment, 13 4: 347-361. doi:10.1177/1077559508321272

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Author Calam, Rachel
Sanders, Matthew R.
Miller, Chloe
Sadhnani, Vaneeta
Carmont, Sue-Ann
Title Can technology and the media help reduce dysfunctional parenting and increase engagement with preventative parenting interventions?
Journal name Child Maltreatment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1077-5595
1552-6119
Publication date 2008-11-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1077559508321272
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 13
Issue 4
Start page 347
End page 361
Total pages 15
Editor S. J. Ondersma
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject C1
920209 Mental Health Services
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract In an evaluation of the television series "Driving Mum and Dad Mad," 723 families participated and were randomly assigned to either a standard or technology enhanced viewing condition ( included additional Web-support). Parents in both conditions reported significant improvements from pre- to postintervention in their child's behavior, dysfunctional parenting, parental anger, depression, and self-efficacy. Short-term improvements were maintained at 6-months follow-up. Regressions identified predictors of program outcomes and level of involvement. Parents who watched the entire series had more severe problems at preintervention and high sociodemographic risk than parents who did not watch the entire series. Few sociodemographic, child, or parent variables assessed at preintervention predicted program outcomes or program engagement, suggesting that a wide range of parents from diverse socioeconomic status benefited from the program. Media interventions depicting evidence-based parenting programs may be a useful means of reaching hard to engage families in population-level child maltreatment prevention programs.
Formatted abstract
In an evaluation of the television series "Driving Mum and Dad Mad," 723 families participated and were randomly assigned to either a standard or technology enhanced viewing condition (included additional Web-support). Parents in both conditions reported significant improvements from pre- to postintervention in their child's behavior, dysfunctional parenting, parental anger, depression, and self-efficacy. Short-term improvements were maintained at 6-months follow-up. Regressions identified predictors of program outcomes and level of involvement. Parents who watched the entire series had more severe problems at preintervention and high sociodemographic risk than parents who did not watch the entire series. Few sociodemographic, child, or parent variables assessed at preintervention predicted program outcomes or program engagement, suggesting that a wide range of parents from diverse socioeconomic status benefited from the program. Media interventions depicting evidence-based parenting programs may be a useful means of reaching hard to engage families in population-level child maltreatment prevention programs.
© 2008 Sage Publications
Keyword Population
Dissemination of Triple P
Parenting
Family intervention
Media
Level 1 evidence
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 18:49:13 EST by Mrs Jennifer English on behalf of School of Psychology