Spontaneous electrochemical removal of aqueous sulfide

Dutta, Paritam K., Rabaey, Korneel, Yuan, Zhiguo and Keller, Jurg (2008) Spontaneous electrochemical removal of aqueous sulfide. Water Research, 42 20: 4965-4975. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2008.09.007


Author Dutta, Paritam K.
Rabaey, Korneel
Yuan, Zhiguo
Keller, Jurg
Title Spontaneous electrochemical removal of aqueous sulfide
Journal name Water Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1354
Publication date 2008-12-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.watres.2008.09.007
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 42
Issue 20
Start page 4965
End page 4975
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject C1
9699 Other Environment
090409 Wastewater Treatment Processes
04 Earth Sciences
0499 Other Earth Sciences
Abstract most of the existing sulfide removal processes from wastewaters and waste gases require substantial amounts of energy inputs. Here we present an electrochemical method by means of a fuel cell that removes sulfide while producing energy. A lab scale fuel cell was operated at ambient temperature and neutral pH, which was capable of removing aqueous sulfide continuously for 2 months at a rate of 0.62 +/- 0.1 kg S m(-3) d(1) of net anodic compartment (NAC) (0.28 +/- 0.05 kg S m(-3) d(-1) of total anodic compartment, TAC). During continuous operation, on average, the power generated was 12 +/- 2 W m(3) NAC (5 +/- 1 W m(-3) TAC), with a maximum capacity of the cell of 166 W m(3) NAC (74 W m(-3) TAC), Potassium ferricyanide was used as cathodic electron acceptor. Elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product that was deposited on the anode. in this abiotic fuel cell, the sulfide oxidation rate was not diminished by the presence of an organic electron donor (acetate) during batch experiments while the acetate concentration remained unchanged. This is particularly important for selective sulfide removal from wastewater where organics are essential for downstream nutrient removal. Elemental sulfur deposited on the anode appeared to limit the operation of the fuel cell after 3 months of operation, necessitating periodic removal of the accumulated sulfur from the electrode. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
Most of the existing sulfide removal processes from wastewaters and waste gases require substantial amounts of energy inputs. Here we present an electrochemical method by means of a fuel cell that removes sulfide while producing energy. A lab scale fuel cell was operated at ambient temperature and neutral pH, which was capable of removing aqueous sulfide continuously for 2 months at a rate of 0.62 ± 0.1 kg S m−3 d−1 of net anodic compartment (NAC) (0.28 ± 0.05 kg S m−3 d1 of total anodic compartment, TAC). During continuous operation, on average, the power generated was 12 ± 2 W m−3 NAC (5 ± 1 W m−3 TAC), with a maximum capacity of the cell of 166 W m−3 NAC (74 W m−3 TAC). Potassium ferricyanide was used as cathodic electron acceptor. Elemental sulfur was identified as the predominant final oxidation product that was deposited on the anode. In this abiotic fuel cell, the sulfide oxidation rate was not diminished by the presence of an organic electron donor (acetate) during batch experiments while the acetate concentration remained unchanged. This is particularly important for selective sulfide removal from wastewater where organics are essential for downstream nutrient removal. Elemental sulfur deposited on the anode appeared to limit the operation of the fuel cell after 3 months of operation, necessitating periodic removal of the accumulated sulfur from the electrode.
Keyword Sulfide
Wastewater
Fuel cell
Electricity
Removal
Elemental sulfur
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP0666927
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Advanced Water Management Centre Publications
 
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