Efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral program to improve psychological adjustment among soldiers in recruit training

Cohn, Andrew and Pakenham, Ken (2008) Efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral program to improve psychological adjustment among soldiers in recruit training. Military Medicine, 173 12: 1151-1157. doi:10.7205/MILMED.173.12.1151


Author Cohn, Andrew
Pakenham, Ken
Title Efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral program to improve psychological adjustment among soldiers in recruit training
Journal name Military Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0026-4075
Publication date 2008-12-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.7205/MILMED.173.12.1151
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 173
Issue 12
Start page 1151
End page 1157
Total pages 7
Editor Duffy, Dr. John C
Place of publication United States
Publisher Association of Military Surgeons of the U S
Language eng
Subject C1
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
920410 Mental Health
Abstract This study evaluated the efficacy of a brief cognitive-behavioral program in modifying causal attributions, expectancy of control, coping strategies, and psychological adjustment in a sample of Australian Army soldiers undergoing a 45-day recruit training program. Participants (N = 174) were randomly allocated within platoons to a treatment group (N = 101) or control group (N = 73). Data were collected before and after the intervention and 23 days later, at the end of training. Compared with the control group, those who received the intervention reported more temporary and specific attributions, less reliance on self-blame coping, greater positive states of mind, and lower psychological distress at the end of training. Copyright
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 03:56:12 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology