Bringing evidence to bear on policy processes: the challenge of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute

Glasgow, Nicholas J., Marley, John E., Kristjanson, Linda J., Donovan, Janette A., Hall, Sally J., Harris, Mark F., Lyle, David M., Kerr, Elizabeth J. and Rayner, Frith (2008) Bringing evidence to bear on policy processes: the challenge of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute. The Medical Journal of Australia, 188 8 Supp.: S46-S49.


Author Glasgow, Nicholas J.
Marley, John E.
Kristjanson, Linda J.
Donovan, Janette A.
Hall, Sally J.
Harris, Mark F.
Lyle, David M.
Kerr, Elizabeth J.
Rayner, Frith
Title Bringing evidence to bear on policy processes: the challenge of the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute
Journal name The Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
Publication date 2008-04-21
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 188
Issue 8 Supp.
Start page S46
End page S49
Total pages 4
Editor Martin Van Der Weyden
Place of publication Pyrmont, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Language eng
Subject C1
920208 Health Policy Evaluation
111717 Primary Health Care
Abstract The Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) is part of the Primary Health Care Research Evaluation and Development (PHCRED) strategy.1 The Institute was the most recent element of the PHCRED strategy to be established, beginning research activities following the appointment of the Research Advisory Board (RAB) in November 2003. APHCRI’s mission is to “provide national leadership in improving the quality and effectiveness of primary health care through the conduct of high quality priority-driven research and the support and promotion of best practice”.2 APHCRI has a specific focus on the links between primary health care evidence and policy. Its activities not only fund research programs, but also seek to build capacity within the research community and policy community to facilitate the adoption of evidence into policy. There are two important interdependent features in the APHCRI model adopted to fulfil this mission. Firstly, it is a “virtual” institute operating a “hub and spoke” model. The Institute comprises staff based at the Australian National University (the “hub”) and, within different streams of research activities, multiple “spokes” undertaking commissioned programs of research. Secondly, the Institute has a specific pool of funds to commission research — it both funds research and undertakes research. The Institute’s RAB sets the research priorities, oversees the independent assessment of applications for funding and determines the successful spokes. Groups compete to be commissioned within a particular stream of research, but, once successful, collaborate as part of the virtual institute. In this article, we provide an overview of the approach APHCRI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 03:27:01 EST by Sharon Doyle on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences