'Esprit de nation' and popular modernity: Aussie magazine 1920-1931

Carter, David (2008) 'Esprit de nation' and popular modernity: Aussie magazine 1920-1931. History Australia: Journal of the Australian Historical Assocation, 5 3: 74.1-74.22. doi:10.2104/ha080074

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Author Carter, David
Title 'Esprit de nation' and popular modernity: Aussie magazine 1920-1931
Formatted title
'Esprit de nation' and popular modernity: Aussie magazine 1920-1931
Journal name History Australia: Journal of the Australian Historical Assocation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1449-0854
1833-4881
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2104/ha080074
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 3
Start page 74.1
End page 74.22
Total pages 23
Editor Quartly, Marian
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Monash University ePress
Language eng
Subject C1
950503 Understanding Australia's Past
210303 Australian History (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)
200502 Australian Literature (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Literature)
Abstract This essay examines the intersection of populist nationalism and popular modernity in Aussie (1920–1931), a commercial magazine of opinion, review and entertainment that flourished in Sydney between the wars. Aussie has been overlooked in comparison to its better-known contemporaries Smiths Weekly and the Bulletin, despite occupying the same public-commercial sphere and same discursive space as those magazines. Aussie had a significant past as the main soldiers’ paper of the First World War; in its postwar format it built a sizeable circulation on both sides of the Tasman; and for more than a decade it published the major Australian writers and cartoonists of the day. The essay seeks not only to restore the magazine to its position as a significant player in the print culture of its period but also to use this case study to explore methodological questions about the historical interpretation of magazines as complex texts and the nature of Australian modernity. In particular it explores the gap between the nationalist editorial platform of the magazine and the investment in new forms of consumer and gender modernity found elsewhere in its pages. The magazine’s ambivalence towards the modern was institutional, not merely ideological, a function of its position in a modernising print marketplace. This article has been peer-reviewed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 03:10:15 EST by Vicky McNicol on behalf of School of Communication and Arts