Backbone cyclised peptides from plants show molluscicidal activity against the rice pest pomacaea canaliculata (golden apple snail)

Plan, Manuel R. Rey, Saska, Ivana, Cagauan, Arsenia and Craik, David J. (2008) Backbone cyclised peptides from plants show molluscicidal activity against the rice pest pomacaea canaliculata (golden apple snail). Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 56 13: 5237-5241. doi:10.1021/jf800302f


Author Plan, Manuel R. Rey
Saska, Ivana
Cagauan, Arsenia
Craik, David J.
Title Backbone cyclised peptides from plants show molluscicidal activity against the rice pest pomacaea canaliculata (golden apple snail)
Formatted title
Backbone cyclised peptides from plants show molluscicidal activity against the rice pest pomacaea canaliculata (golden apple snail)
Journal name Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8561
1520-5118
Publication date 2008-06-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/jf800302f
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 56
Issue 13
Start page 5237
End page 5241
Total pages 5
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Amercian Chemical Society
Language eng
Subject C1
860703 Crop Protection Chemicals
030401 Biologically Active Molecules
Abstract Golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) are serious pests of rice in South East Asia. Cyclotides are backbone cyclized peptides produced by plants from Rubiaceae and Violaceae. In this study, we investigated the molluscicidal activity of cyclotides against golden apple snails. Crude cyclotide extracts from both Oldenlandia affinis and Viola odorata plants showed molluscicidal activity comparable to the synthetic molluscicide metaldehyde. Individual cyclotides from each extract demonstrated a range of molluscicidal activities. The cyclotides cycloviolacin O1, kalata B1, and kalata B2 were more toxic to golden apple snails than metaldehyde, while kalata B7 and kalata B8 did not cause significant mortality. The toxicity of the cyclotide kalata B2 on a nontarget species, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), was three times lower than the common piscicide rotenone. Our findings suggest that the existing diversity of cyclotides in plants could be used to develop natural molluscicides.
Formatted abstract
Golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) are serious pests of rice in South East Asia. Cyclotides are backbone cyclized peptides produced by plants from Rubiaceae and Violaceae. In this study, we investigated the molluscicidal activity of cyclotides against golden apple snails. Crude cyclotide extracts from both Oldenlandia affinis and Viola odorata plants showed molluscicidal activity comparable to the synthetic molluscicide metaldehyde. Individual cyclotides from each extract demonstrated a range of molluscicidal activities. The cyclotides cycloviolacin O1, kalata B1, and kalata B2 were more toxic to golden apple snails than metaldehyde, while kalata B7 and kalata B8 did not cause significant mortality. The toxicity of the cyclotide kalata B2 on a nontarget species, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), was three times lower than the common piscicide rotenone. Our findings suggest that the existing diversity of cyclotides in plants could be used to develop natural molluscicides.
Keyword Agriculture, Multidisciplinary
Chemistry, Applied
Food Science & Technology
Agriculture
Chemistry
Food Science & Technology
AGRICULTURE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
CHEMISTRY, APPLIED
FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: 2009 Higher Education Research Data Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 16 Apr 2009, 00:54:31 EST by Jennifer Greder on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience